Are drawstrings the fashion to tie for?

Kid News

Just for kids

May 20, 1999|By Therese Kauchak | Therese Kauchak,Chicago Tribune

What's the thing with the string? It used to be that drawstrings made appearances only on your old sweatpants and favorite flannel pajamas. But these days they can be found on all kinds of clothing: track pants, cargo pants, jeans, shorts, shirts, skirts, dresses, even bathing suits.

So are drawstring clothes really popular, or are shoppers being strung along by clothing designers trying to create a new fad?

"Some clothing companies are really pushing drawstrings," Sam M., 12, says. "But the clothes would be popular anyway. Kids like them because they're comfortable and they look nice."

Kids also say heavy advertising by stores like Old Navy -- whose stores offer a "drawstring shop" and whose TV ads are hard to escape -- do influence the styles they wear.

"Old Navy gets the ad stuck in your head, and then you go to school and everyone's singing it," Cassie M., 12, says.

Plus, once at the mall, it's hard not to spot something drawstring in most clothing stores. We found drawstring-waist cargo pants at Old Navy, JC Penney, The Limited, Gap, Express and Abercrombie & Fitch.

Our other fave finds include:

For guys ...

Drawstring-waist board shorts with contrasting side stripe ($34, Abercrombie & Fitch). In red, khaki, navy and yellow.

Cargo pants with drawstring ankle ($48, Gap). Made of polyester with Teflon coating to repel water and stains. In tan, green and black.

For girls ...

Surfer-style backpack with drawstring tie ($39, Roxy Boardshorts). Find at Nordstrom.

Cotton tank with drawstring neck and embroidered flowers and butterfly ($24, GapKids).

Short cotton/spandex skirts with drawstring waist ($19.50, Express). In light blue, green, aqua, red and fuchsia.

Absolutely everything drawstring from Delia's. Call (800) DELIA-NY for a catalog.

(c) 1997 Chicago Tribune. Distributed by Knight-Ridder/Tribune, Inc.

Pub Date: 05/20/99

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