A fun recipe that's lighter than air

May 08, 1999|By Kelly DeGarmo | Kelly DeGarmo,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM

FORT WORTH, Texas -- Give 5-year-old Shelby Hulitt a bottle of slimy, soapy bubbles and a hot-pink wand and she'll burst into laughter within seconds. Bubbles have that magical appeal.

"Girls and boys love bubbles. Adults love bubbles. They're so fascinating," says Marla Wolf, teacher-turned-bubble-scientist.

Even the smallest kids can create huge, rainbow bubbles with today's nifty bubble blowers. Toy companies are dipping into success with wacky bubble tubes, battery-operated wands and character toys, such as Rugrats and Mr. Potato Head.

The science of "bubbleology' is so dazzling to children, Fort Worth Clean City's Camp Earth has a class devoted to it.

"There are so many science concepts related to bubbles: sublimation, surface tension, color spectrum, cohesion," says Wolf, who teaches the bubble course.

Besides exploring kinds and sizes of bubbles, kids learn how to create bubble blowers with everyday household items like sieves, colanders, soup cans and slotted spoons. Plastic plates and aluminum pie tins are great to dip bubble solution out of.

For noncrafty parents, the toy industry makes it easy and relatively inexpensive. Among the hottest-selling bubble products are those made by Koosh. New this year are Rugrats Micro Bubbles (which create hundreds of tiny bubbles, $2.99), Mr. Potato Head Bubble Fun (with eight removable parts that turn into wands, $6.99), and Jumba Bubba (a giant battery-operated wand, $12.99).

Bubble recipe

Make your own bubble solution at home with this recipe from Camp Earth:

1 cup liquid dishwashing soap

1 cup light Karo syrup

4 to 5 cups distilled water

Gently mix ingredients in a pitcher or jug without shaking. Allow mixture to sit at room temperature for seven days before using.

Pub Date: 5/08/99

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