How to anchor straying start button

Help Line

February 22, 1999|By JAMES COATES | JAMES COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE

My Windows 98 Start button is at the top of my screen rather than in the lower left corner, where it is supposed to be. Also, everything is too large. Can you help me?

The Windows taskbar is set up to lie at the bottom of the screen but can be moved to any of the four sides of the display by clicking the mouse with the arrow pointer on the task bar just beyond the Start button.

You then make a sweeping motion toward either side and the taskbar will move to run vertically along the right or left side of the screen or horizontally at the top or bottom.

It is easier to do this than it is to describe it, and you'll get the hang in a jiffy.

Your second problem is fixed by shrinking the thickness of the task bar. To do this you move the arrow pointer to the very edge of the taskbar until two small black arrows appear.

Clicking on these arrows and dragging them sizes the bar anywhere from a single line to half the screen.

When we shut down or restart, the machine often hangs up on the display that says ``Wait for your computer to shut down.'' What causes this and what can we do about it? I turn the machine off manually and then have to suffer through Scandisk after it tells me Windows was not properly shut down.

Next time your machine hangs on shutdown, take a long lunch break and don't touch that off switch for a couple of hours.

Bizarre things can happen with the Windows 98 shutdown sequence on a PC with a lot of RAM. Your machine probably is furiously moving data in memory, trying to restore settings, remap video displays and do other stuff that doesn't register any visible sign of life.

This process can take much longer than most users expect. You assume the system has crashed when it's moping. If you hit the off switch before the machine finishes a shutdown routine, the same thing will happen next time you try to power off. If I am right, you'll come back from lunch and find a machine that has gotten its stuff together and won't freeze up on shutdown any more.

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