Arts and scarvesOne day as I was unloading my sprouts at...

STYLE FILE

February 07, 1999|By A.M. Chaplin | A.M. Chaplin,Sun Staff

Arts and scarves

One day as I was unloading my sprouts at the Fresh Fields' cash register, a woman pulled up behind me. Floating over her sweater and jeans were gorgeous drifts of color, which on closer inspection turned out to be several large and very beautiful scarves.

I'm nosy. I asked. She told me her name is Mercedes Shriver (above), and that she makes those scarves and sells them. And they'll work as sarongs or head wraps as well as scarves.

Shriver grew up in Guilford. She's been a painter since she was 16, she says, and has always loved clothing. "Put those two together, and that's what you get," she says -- wearable fabrics that are as much like art as clothing.

The scarves are sold at the Store Ltd. in Cross Keys; a large one is $320. Or you can buy them from Shriver herself at her studio in the Broom Factory at 1301 Baylis St.; call 410-327-3131.

Making tracks

Once upon a time, many years ago, the name Dr. Scholl referred to a chain of shoe stores that sold "sensible" shoes -- which in shoe-talk means "ugly but won't give you bunions."

Eventually, though, Dr. Scholl stopped being about shoes and instead became about arch supports and corn pads -- until, a couple of years ago, Dr. Scholl's Original Exercise Sandal was reissued and became a surprise fashion hit.

It's a hit that may have a sequel. The company that now uses the Scholl name has come out with its first closed shoe: a Mary Jane ballerina flat with a roomy-looking toe -- just the thing for this spring's feminine looks. It's called Dr. Charm and comes in several pearlized colors as well as black. The suggested retail price is $40.

Call 800-766-6465 to find the store nearest you or the names of catalogs that carry the shoe. -- A.M.C.

Fair question

Blondes do have more fun -- I know, I used to be one. Blondes also have more trouble keeping their hair looking good, or at least I did, which is why I listened up when a fair friend told me that new products made just for blond hair are proliferating.

At the high end is Frederic Fekkai's Baby Blonde shampoo ($18.50), which can be ordered by calling 888-F-FEKKAI.

Then there's the Brocato Blonde line, with five products: two shampoos and the Bodifying Rinse (each $10), a treatment ($19.95) and the Glow Glisten Spray ($14.95). The line is available at salons in this area, among them Hair 2000 and Looking Good in Glen Burnie.

John Frieda, of Frizz-Ease fame, calls his line sheer blonde. He has shampoo and conditioner (each $6.50) in two formulations, one for light blondes and one for darker shades. He shines in the grooming category with a shaping and highlighting balm ($5.50), a glossing creme ($6.50) and a mousse ($5.50). The line is available at CVS and Rite-Aid, among other outlets. All prices are suggested retail. -- A.M.C.

Heartthrobs from Frederick's

Valentine's Day approaches, and a man's fancy turns to lurid ladies' underwear. Frederick's of Hollywood is a mainstay in this department, and recently added a page to its Web site (www.fredericks.com) that guys might enjoy. It's called "Meet the Frederick's Models," and it features the young ladies from the Frederick's catalog.

But Frederick's has also undergone some changes that women might enjoy: A year ago the company acquired its first female CEO, Terry Patterson. She is modernizing by gearing stores and catalogs more to female customers than to their men -- more, you might say, to those who read Danielle Steele than to those who read Penthouse.

There are still lots of way-sexy undergarments, but less big hair, it seems to me, and more smiles. There's even a pastel sweater twin set. (It does bare the navel, but this is still Frederick's, after all.)

Frederick's has stores in Rosedale, Forestville, Gaithersburg, Glen Burnie and Hyattsville, or call 800-323-9525 for the catalog. -- A.M.C.

Pub Date: 02/07/99

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