The brand-new reader

PARENTS' CORNER

February 07, 1999|By Jerdine Nolen

Hearing your child's first attempts at reading is a joyous occasion. Even if the child stumbles over the words here and there, it is still a joyous event. Parents or guardians know that with repetition and practice, fluency comes. Reading is a rite of passage. The child has begun the process of breaking the language code. The child is changing and becoming an independent communicator and learner.

What You Can Do to Support Your Child

* Talk about your child's growth and changes in terms of how they have improved as a reader/communicator.

* Bring your own personal experiences to what you are reading: "That reminds me of ..." or "How did that make you feel when ..."

* Give freely those tools your child will need to be a successful communicator.

* Talk to your child about the world around her.

* Speak in complete sentences.

* Encourage your child to speak in complete sentences/thoughts.

* Give freely those things your child will need to use in spoken language to make the connections to written language.

* Say, "apple." Show the child the apple. Show what the word "apple" looks like. Write it down. Talk about the color, the shape, the smell. Eat the apple.

Make cake, pie, jelly or applesauce. Let your child help.

Create personal experience with "apple." You are building a knowledge base for your child.

When your child sees "apple" again, he or she has experiences to call on. This is an important part of learning to read.

And, you have created lasting lifetime memories with the word/thing "apple."

Pub Date: 02/07/99

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