In Baltimore CountyChildren get extras with first library...

Education Digest

February 07, 1999

In Baltimore County

Children get extras with first library card

ESSEX -- The county's Essex library has its own version of Welcome Wagon for young readers embarking on book adventures by getting their first library card.

Children up to age 9 signing up for their first card -- who must be accompanied by a parent with proper identification -- will receive a bag containing a book, pencil, activity sheet, book lists, bookmark, and the library's calendar of events.

Whenever possible, the greeting includes a visit to the information desk and a tour of the children's fiction section, highlighting appropriate material. The goal, says library official E. J. Woznicki, is to "make children getting a card for the first time feel special and welcomed to the library." The branch is in the Middlesex Shopping Center. Information: 410-887-0295.

Author to address language learning problems

OWINGS MILLS -- Priscilla Vail, an author and authority on language learning differences, will be the speaker for the 16th annual David H. Malin Lecture sponsored by Jemicy School for dyslexic youngsters at 6 p.m. Feb. 25.

Vail will talk about how language learning difficulties affect a child's self-concept. She is the author of nine books, including "Learning Styles: Food for Thought" and "Smart Kids with School Problems: Things to Know, Ways to Help."

The lecture is free, but reservations must be made by calling Jemicy at 410-653-2700. The lecture will take place at the Burck Performing Arts Center at McDonogh School, 8600 McDonogh Road, Owings Mills.

In Howard County

School kicks off `Building Blocks' program

ELLICOTT CITY -- Hollifield Station Elementary School has kicked off its annual Reading Incentive Program, which is aimed not only at building readership but building a house of sorts.

In the "Building Blocks to the Future" program, which runs through March, each reading team earns Lego pieces with its accumulated reading time.

With the Lego pieces -- and help from the school's business partner, Grayson Homes -- math pupils will design and build a toy house.

For the notebook

Computer finds words most often printed

If you were a reading teacher, which words should you teach first? One obvious answer is words that appear most frequently in English. Thanks to the computer, we know what they are.

According to Heritage Dictionary's computer:

Ten percent of all words printed in books, magazines and newspapers are "the" and "of."

Twenty percent of all printed words are "the," "of," "and," "to," "a" and "in."

Thirty percent of printed words are the above, plus "is," "you," "that," "it," "he," "for," "was," "on," "are," "as," "with," "his," "they," and "at."

Pub Date: 2/07/99

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