Volleyball Coach of Year leaving town

Howard notebook

February 05, 1999|By Stan Rappaport | Stan Rappaport,SUN STAFF

Kedre Fairley, The Sun's Howard County volleyball Coach of the Year, will not return next season.

Fairley's husband, Darryl, has been promoted to a district manager position for Johnson & Johnson, and the family will move to either Wisconsin or Illinois. Also, Fairley is expecting her second child in August. The couple has one son, Nickolas, who will turn 5 in March.

Fairley coached at Mount Hebron for three years. Last season's team went unbeaten in county play and was 19-1 overall, losing to eventual Class 2A state champion Centennial in the regionals.

Picking their college

Centennial setter Lisa Chapman, The Sun's Player of the Year in 1998, selected Towson University for a number of reasons.

"It's a Division I school. It's a good school and has the programs that I want," said Chapman, who signed Wednesday. "And they made me a good offer. You really can't ask for anything more."

Chapman received an academic scholarship her first year and a full athletic scholarship for the next three years.

Another reason Chapman liked Towson was the positive feedback she received from former Centennial players Briana Zolak and Marcy Cangiano.

Zolak, The Sun's Player of the Year in 1997, and Cangiano are freshmen at Towson. Chapman stayed with Zolak and Cangiano during her official visit in December and two days before Christmas decided on Towson.

Chapman said she probably will major in business and minor in art. She is interested in becoming a graphic designer.

She also said that while she originally wanted to attend college out of state, Towson "is far enough away to have your own life."

The Tigers, coached by Cathy Cain, were 15-9 and 7-7 in the America East Conference last fall.

Hammond soccer goalkeeper Lindsey Mitchell looked at Kent State University last summer and liked what she saw right away. After her official visit in November, she was convinced.

Kent State, 13-7-1 overall and 5-4-1 in the Mid-American Conference last season, will graduate its goalies this spring.

"Basically, they recruited me to start. That was another thing that appealed to me," said Mitchell.

Mitchell, the co-Player of the Year in Howard County, led the Golden Bears to the Class 1A state championship with three shootout victories in the playoffs. The four-year starter finished the season with 133 saves, 14 shutouts and only 10 goals against.

Glenelg soccer goalie Jamie Epperlein, the other county co-Player of the Year, signed with Rhode Island University, 12-7-1 last fall, 6-4-1 in the Atlantic 10.

"I liked the team. I liked the coaches. I just like the atmosphere," said Epperlein, who plans to major in English education.

Glenelg, which won the Class 1A-2A state championship in 1997, finished with its best overall (10-6-0) and county (6-3-0) records ever last season. Epperlein allowed 11 goals and had six shutouts.

Women's Hall of Fame

The third annual Howard County Women's Athletics Hall of Fame inductions and alumnae basketball game will be held tomorrow at River Hill.

The festivities begin at 6 p.m. with the alumnae game. The inductions of Ginger Kincaid, Kori Kindbom and Auretha Fleming Baldwin into the Hall of Fame will follow, and the evening will be capped with the Howard-River Hill girls basketball game.

Admission will be $3 for adults and $2 for students. Youngsters 12-and-under wearing a youth-league jersey and accompanied by a paying adult will be admitted free.

Kincaid, at Glenelg since 1978, is coaching field hockey and lacrosse. Kindbom was an outstanding three-sport athlete (field hockey, basketball, softball) at Atholton before graduating in 1981, and Fleming, a 1980 Oakland Mills graduate, excelled in basketball and track and field.

Shirley Cohee, a former coach at Atholton, and Kelly Storr, Wilde Lake's girls basketball coach, will direct the alumnae game teams of players from the 1960s through the 1990s.

Lois Norman, Debbie Paladino and Barbara Streaker were inducted into the Hall of Fame last year. The first year's inductees were Rhonda Bates, Betty Lang, Amy Mallon, Donna Neale, Gail Purcell, and Carol Satterwhite.

Indoor track

Some odds and ends from Tuesday's Ivan Walker indoor track county championships at the 5th Regiment Armory, where three county and 11 meet records were set.

Glenelg's girls team scored in 11 of 13 events, but Long Reach, which placed in only six events, took its second straight title.

Long Reach's girls 800 relay team of Rolanda Howard, Cynthia Nicholls, Anya Clark and Teyarnte Carter broke a county and meet record, finishing in 1: 48.5. Carter, Howard and Nicholls were first, third and fourth in the 55 dash for 20 points, and Nicholls and Howard took first and second, respectively, in the 55 hurdles for 18 points.

Carter and Howard finished first and third in the 300, good for 16 points. The Lightning also got nine points in the shot put -- Cristina Sasso was second and Martine Moore was sixth -- and eight points from Nicholls' second-place finish in the high jump.

"I'm so proud of the girls. They pulled together and scored points I never thought they were capable of scoring," said Long Reach coach Joe Thomas, referring to shot put and high jump points.

Thomas knew his team would score well in the 55 hurdles and 55 dash, back-to-back events that earned the Lightning 38 points in 10 minutes.

"That was definitely the key to our victory," Thomas said.

River Hill coach Norm Belden called his boys' victory "a total team effort." The Hawks scored in every event except the shot put and mile relay.

"They went after it. It was great," Belden said. "I'm proud of them. They set a goal, and they went out and got it."

The turning point for River Hill was scoring the maximum 24 points in the 3,200 run. Mike Prada won, followed by Mike Styczynski and Shane Stroup.

"The distance boys rocked," Belden said. "That 3,200 run, when they finished one, two, three, that's hard to beat."

Pub Date: 2/05/99

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