Norman L. Dresden, 72, trucking company executiveNorman L...

January 24, 1999

Norman L. Dresden, 72, trucking company executive

Norman L. Dresden, a retired trucking company executive who lived in White Marsh, died Monday from complications of diabetes at Sinai Hospital. He was 72.

Mr. Dresden retired in August from ABF Freight Lines in Baltimore, where he had been director of government sales for more than 22 years.

Earlier, Mr. Dresden, who began his trucking career in Chicago, worked for the Transcon and Pacific Intermountain Express trucking companies in sales.

Born and raised in Chicago, where he graduated from high school, he served in the Navy during World War II in the Pacific. He was active in the Veterans of Foreign Wars and American Legion.

In the late 1940s, he married Betty Chaney, who died in 1990.

He is survived by two daughters, Janice Murphy of Vista, Calif., and Judy Adams of Van Nuys, Calif.; three granddaughters; five great-grandchildren; and special friend Dena Metz of Baltimore.

Services will be held at 9: 30 a.m. tomorrow at the Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, 7922 Wise Ave.

Mark C. Schlenker, 44, Baltimore-born architect

Mark Clifton Schlenker, a Baltimore-born architect, died of cancer Jan. 16 at his home in Lancaster, Pa. He was 44.

A 1972 graduate of Catonsville High School and a 1976 graduate of the University of Maryland, Mr. Schlenker earned his master's degree in 1980 at Yale University, where he was awarded the American Institute of Architects School Medal.

He then embarked upon a career that included stints at various architectural firms, including Baltimore's RTKL Associates Inc. during the early 1980s. Most recently, at Reese Lower Patrick & Scott in Lancaster, he specialized in designing assisted-living facilities.

He was married in 1990 to the former Patricia Berenson, who along with their 7-year-old twin sons, Erik and Martin, survives him. Other survivors include his parents, Warren and Leah Schlenker of Chestertown; and two brothers, Karl Schlenker of Catonsville and Eric Schlenker of Minneapolis.

A memorial service for Mr. Schlenker, who donated his body, will be held at 1: 30 p.m. Feb 20 at the Community Mennonite Church in Lancaster.

Anne K. Whinnie, 87, homemaker and accountant

Anne K. Whinnie, a homemaker who worked many years ago as an accountant for coal-mining companies, died Thursday of heart failure at the St. Agnes Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Ellicott City. She was 87.

A resident of Cumberland for nearly 50 years, she had been active there with the Girl Scouts, Sacred Heart Hospital and SS. Peter and Paul Roman Catholic Church, where a Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 11 a.m. tomorrow.

Born near Johnstown, Pa., the former Anne Koscho was a graduate of Cambria Business College there. Married in 1937 to Francis W. Whinnie, she was an accountant until the birth of her first child.

The couple lived in Cumberland from 1942 until Mr. Whinnie's death in 1990, when Mrs. Whinnie moved to Columbia.

She is survived by three daughters, Nancy J. Grace and Ruth Axley, both of Columbia, and Suzanne Grant of Portland, Maine; 11 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

Iva R. Marschall, 81, Hamilton homemaker

Iva R. Marschall, a homemaker who worked for the federal government during the 1940s and later at Towson University, died at her home Thursday of arteriosclerotic heart disease. She was 81 and had lived in Hamilton for almost half a century.

Born in Baltimore, the former Iva Perry was a graduate of Eastern High School and attended the University of Baltimore.

In 1943, she married Alfred Marschall, who died in 1979. From 1966 until retiring in 1971, she was an assistant to the registrar in the admissions department at Towson University.

She was a member of Northside Baptist Church on East Northern Parkway and enjoyed growing roses in a backyard garden.

Services will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Leonard J. Ruck funeral home, 5305 Harford Road.

She is survived by a son, Richard A. Marschall of Baldwin; two grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.

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