Free throws help Georgia Tech pull away from Terps, 72-56

23 fouls hurt Maryland

Hopkins rallies for win

State women

January 22, 1999|By FROM STAFF REPORTS

Niesha Butler scored a game-high 20 points, Danielle Donehew had 17 and Jaime Kruppa added eight points and 12 rebounds yesterday to lead Georgia Tech to a 72-56 win over visiting Maryland in Atlantic Coast Conference women's basketball last night.

The Yellow Jackets (10-8, 3-5) won the game on the free-throw line. They made 16 of 24 attempts, while the Terps (3-14, 1-7) were just 2-for-3 from the line for the game. The Terps committed 23 fouls to Georgia Tech's 10.

Regina Tate also hit double figures for the Yellow Jackets, scoring 13 points and pulling down nine rebounds.

Kelley Gibson led the Terps with 14 points, and Deedee Warley had 12.

Georgia Tech led 28-22 at halftime and made 12 of 17 free-throw attempts in the second half. Kruppa hit all six of her attempts.

Johns Hopkins 61, Franklin & Marshall 59: The Blue Jays (13-3, 6-0) roared back from a 15-point halftime deficit to overtake the host Diplomats (7-8, 2-4) and stay unbeaten in the Centennial Conference.

F&M trailed 60-59 and had possession with 15 seconds left in the game, but a turnover ruined its chance of a last-second shot for the win. The Blue Jays' Leslie Ritter hit a free throw with two seconds left to secure the victory.

Ritter scored 17 points and had five rebounds, five assists, seven steals and a blocked shot to lead the Blue Jays, who shot just 25 percent (9-for-36) from the field in the first half when F&M took a 38-23 lead.

Junior center Marjahna Segers scored 14 points and had a game-high 12 rebounds, and sophomore forward Molly Malloy added 10 points for Johns Hopkins.

Bowie State 76, Virginia Union 61: Rashida Brooks scored 18 points, Tiffany Moss had 17 and Beverly Winstead added 14 to lead the Bulldogs (15-3) over the host Panthers (10-6) in a nonconference game.

Pub Date: 1/22/99

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