Davidson aims at 2,000 points

Boys basketball: Chapelgate star, who also plays soccer and baseball, needs 156 in his next nine games to reach a tough milestone that will rank him with some pretty good metro-area players.

January 22, 1999|By Rick Belz | Rick Belz,SUN STAFF

A milestone that few Maryland high school athletes ever achieve is fast approaching for Chapelgate's Chris Davidson.

He's only 156 points away from scoring his 2,000th career point.

Barring injury, he seems certain to reach that mark, because nine regular-season games and the playoffs remain, and he is averaging 22.9 points.

Of course, Davidson's competition hasn't been as tough as it was for Howard County's other 2,000-point scorer, Mount Hebron's Barry Young, holder of the public school record, 2,153 career points.

Some private school players have scored more than Young, among them St. Maria Goretti's Rodney Monroe with 3,047 points, Cardinal Gibbons' Quinton Dailey with 2,844 points, and Calvert Hall's Duane Ferrell with 2,317 points.

Do the math, and it is easy to see why so few players have scored 2,000 points. You need to average 25 points a game for 20 games for four seasons.

"Scoring 2,000 points is obviously quite an accomplishment," Flames coach Gary Berwager said. "But he's more than just a shooter."

Davidson, 6-foot-1 and 170 pounds, also averages six rebounds and nearly four assists.

"He jumps well and has been among our team rebounding leaders the past couple of years, and is also up there in assists. He's a good passer," Berwager said. "He knows that if he can get the ball inside to someone else, then it will open things up for him outside. He drives and dishes off well."

Davidson's accuracy is also outstanding. He averages 50 percent from two-point range and 40 percent from three-point range. He's sunk 244 career three-pointers.

"He can get unbelievably hot," Berwager said. "Against Beth Tfiloh this season, he scored 25 points in the fourth quarter."

Chapelgate (7-4 overall, 2-1 league) lost that game by two points, its only league setback.

Davidson slashes to the basket and draws lots of fouls, so his 80 percent career free-throw shooting percentage also comes in handy.

"People hang all over him and play all kinds of strange defenses against him," Berwager said. "But he works well without the ball to get open."

Consistency is also a Davidson strength. Only one school, rival Glenelg Country, has held Davidson in single digits. He scored only five points against the Dragons, but Chapelgate, experiencing its fourth straight winning season, won the game.

Davidson holds the school single-game scoring record with 43 points, a feat he accomplished twice in one week last season.

The possibility of scoring 2,000 points didn't occur to him until after his sophomore season.

"Now it is something I want to do," he said.

Davidson played against Talmudical Academy's Tamir Goodman this season and called him the best player he's faced. Goodman, a junior who has committed orally to Maryland, scored 40 points against Chapelgate. Davidson scored 26.

The Flames played in a Glenelg Country School summer basketball league that included teams representing public schools Mount Hebron, Glenelg, River Hill, Liberty and Howard, and he enjoyed the tougher competition. "I did well, but our team usually lost."

Basketball is just one of Davidson's talents. He also scored 40 career goals in soccer and last spring batted .500 in baseball with a 5-1 pitching record. Chapelgate competes in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association C Conference.

He'd like to play baseball in college at either UMBC or Towson University and plays baseball for the Dayton Raiders in the Baltimore Metro League during the summer.

He'll have no trouble getting into college. He has a 4.02 grade-point average on a scale of 4.00. "You get extra for your advanced-placement courses," he said.

Pub Date: 1/22/99

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