Annapolis leaves Broadneck out of 'bounds

Cold-shooting Panthers control 2nd-half boards to pull away, 54-43

January 21, 1999|By Pat O'Malley | Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF

Third-ranked Annapolis is so good and deep, with four starters averaging 10 points or more a game, that on a night when they are misfiring, opponents can not allow the Panthers second shots. And it's almost imperative that foes make theirs.

A valiant effort by No. 16 Broadneck came up short last night as the host Panthers (13-0 overall, 7-0 league) decisively out-rebounded the Bruins (7-6, 4-3) in the second half and went on to a hard-earned victory, 54-43.

After out-rebounding the Panthers, 13-12 in the first half, the Bruins were no match the final 16 minutes with Annapolis holding a 24-10 edge on the boards, 36-23 for the game.

Annapolis got second and third shots, and Broadneck was out-rebounded on the offensive board, 12-5.

Annapolis landed only 14-of-45 field goal attempts (31 percent) last night but made 21-of-25 free throws. The majority of the Panthers' points were initiated by rebounds on both ends.

Sophomore Marcus Neal had a game high 19 points (6-for-7 at the line) and nine rebounds, followed by 16 (6-for-6 from the line) from junior Thomas Hawkins (six rebounds.) Another junior, 6-foot-5 Travus Foster had eight points (4-for-4 free throws), 15 boards and three blocked shots.

Annapolis coach John Brady, in his 22nd season, notched his 450th career win against 87 losses.

Broadneck had a 36-23 lead at the break on the strength of a combined 14 points and nine boards from Lehrman Dotson (total 12 points) and Jeff Logan (eight points, 10 rebounds total).

"I was worried a little bit in the first half, when we were down, because the ball just wasn't falling our way," said Foster, referring to a 6-for-21 start. "They were putting good pressure on our shots."

Broadneck took a 37-36 lead into the final eight minutes, but the Panthers had started to assert themselves on the boards in the third quarter.

"We just could not put together four solid quarters," said Bruins coach Ken Kazmarek. "We ended up tying the game 41-41 in the fourth quarter but scored only two more points. We did a poor job getting the ball into Logan in the fourth quarter."

Excellent defense and positioning by Annapolis' Foster were the main reasons for Logan being held scoreless over the game's last 12 minutes.

Three of the Panthers' five field goals in the third period came on put-backs, and a follow by junior Marcus Johnson (seven points, four rebounds) gave Annapolis a 43-41 lead with just under five minutes remaining.

Annapolis had only three field goals in the final quarter but converted 11-of-13 from the line to outscore Broadneck, 18-6.

Kyron Belt's only two points of the night on a baseline drive was the only field goal the Panthers scored in the last four minutes.

"When it started to hit the fan, we just could not generate offense," said Kazmarek, whose Bruins will get another shot at Annapolis at home Feb. 22.

The Panthers and Bruins split last season, each winning on the other's court.

Pub Date: 1/21/99

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