Arthur C. Fatt, 94, one of the founders of Grey...

Deaths Elsewhere

January 18, 1999

Arthur C. Fatt, 94, one of the founders of Grey Advertising and a former chief executive of the company, died Tuesday at his winter home in Delray Beach, Fla.

With Lawrence Valenstein, he started Grey in 1925 with a handful of employees in New York. When they retired, Grey had become one of the nation's leading advertising agencies.

Among the accounts that he brought to the company were Ford Motor Co., Procter & Gamble and Chock Full o' Nuts. He wrote the well-known line for the Greyhound Lines bus company, "Leave the driving to us."

Grey Advertising, which has offices in 90 countries, was ranked last year by Advertising Age as the world's sixth-largest ad agency.

Lady Naomi Mitchison, 101, who was often called the doyenne of Scottish literature, died Jan. 11 in Carradale, Scotland. A poet and novelist, she was a prolific writer, completing more than 80 novels.

Jack David, 90, who founded the Blue Moon Tavern, Seattle's most-famous watering hole, died Jan. 10.

Though he sold the place in 1966, Mr. David was credited for fostering the ambience of the bar, which attracted beatniks, hippies, artists, victims of the 1950s' Communist-baiting, and anti-Vietnam War activists -- along with countless college students and the occasional patron who just wanted a beer.

Mario D. Grossi, 74, a radio physicist who helped develop the concept of the tethered satellite, died of vascular disease Jan. 11 in Boston.

In the 1970s, he and his colleague, Giuseppe Colombo, developed the concept of the tethered satellite, a technique that connects satellites to spacecrafts and allows them to drag through the lower atmosphere. Tethered satellites have several applications, including the generation of electrical power in space.

Rick Bennewitz,62, an Emmy-winning director who worked on NBC's "Sunset Beach," died Jan. 9 of a heart attack in Los Angeles.

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