Some stocks to consider holding and some to think about folding

The Ticker

January 01, 1999|By Julius Westheimer

GOING INTO the new year, these issues are "Core Stocks for Long-Term Capital Gain" in S&P Outlook: Coca-Cola Co., General Electric Co., Intel Corp., IBM Corp., Merck & Co Inc., Safeway Inc. and Federal Home Loan Bank.

And these issues are listed as "Least Popular Stocks" among all newsletters followed by Hulbert Financial Digest: America Online Inc., Cisco Systems Inc., Dell Computer Corp. and Applied Materials Inc.

ROTH REWARDS: "When leaving IRA funds to children and grandchildren, using a Roth IRA is better than a regular IRA. Roth IRA distributions are tax-free when funds are held for five years -- generally true when funds are left to children or grandchildren." (Tax Hotline, Dec.)

BE CAREFUL: "Total junk bond returns outstripped those of general bond funds for the past two years, but that came to an end this year. Junk bonds were hit by the same problems that caused stocks' swoon -- recession fear and profit slowdown -- factors which could affect the ability of junk issuers to honor their obligations." (Income Digest.)

LOOKING BACK: This aging bull market began Aug. 12, 1982, with the Dow Jones industrial average at 776.90.

LOOKING AHEAD: "This is the most overvalued market in the history of U.S. securities markets." (Stockmarket Cycles.)

"Stay bullish. Selective accumulation of stocks remains in order." (S&P Outlook.)

"We can't rule out continued rise in stock prices. Bull market psychology sustains that the uptrend in prices is still intact." (Bank Credit Analyst Research Group.)

"Group action is lousy. Despite new highs in the S&P 500, less than half of all groups act positively." (Addison Report.)

"This is the worst bull market we've seen in 34 years. Despite the Nasdaq's record highs, market breadth is mired at bear market levels. The fun cannot last." (Alan Newman's Crosscurrents.

Pub Date: 1/01/99

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.