Hunters 'greedy, insentive'After reading Peter Baker's...

LETTERS

December 20, 1998

Hunters 'greedy, insentive'

After reading Peter Baker's outdoors column in The Sun on Dec. 13, I have the perfect solution to the deer problem. The Department of Natural Resources should declare an open season with no limits on quantity and sex. This will guarantee the nonsurvival of the species and allow hunters like Michael Slattery to continue their greedy and insensitive behavior.

What really astounds me is how the state of Maryland entrusts people like Slattery and Paul Peditto with the management and maintenance of such an important species. They should work in a slaughterhouse where their real talents can be displayed.

I wish to remind the public how successful DNR has been in the past with its game management programs. The wild duck, geese, shad, rockfish, crab and oyster have all been over-harvested to the point of disappearing.

With the pressure being put on deer via unreported killings, poaching and road kills, will they meet the same fate?

Ronald Stearns

Bel Air

Get back to 0's basics

To Peter Angelos:

I am far from a fair-weather Orioles fan, but last season's record and this year's free-agency tactics are more than even I can stomach. The path to baseball supremacy has always been and always will start with great pitching. As quoted by the best Orioles manager ever, his secret to winning was: "Great pitching, great defense, and an occasional house call from Dr. Long Ball." In case you are not up to date with Orioles history, that statement was made by Earl Weaver.

You have an important responsibility to the city of Baltimore, and that doesn't mean spending money just to say you participated in free agency. It means protecting a tradition that before 1989 was the most winning baseball team of the previous quarter-century.

Our team must return to the basics of developing talent at the farm level and growing our own talent - not buying everyone else's talent.

Don't let your, ego cloud your decisions on what is best for Baltimore baseball.

Steven Fogle

Ponte Vedra Beach, Fla.

Two counterpoints

I had to respond to letters from P. M. Wojciechowski from White Hall and Tom Laratta from Indianapolis in last Sunday's editions of The Sun.

First, regarding Wojciechowski's suggestion to exempt football and baseball players from state taxes: That would only add an additional tax burden on the people of Maryland, especially nonsport enthusiasts. He was right when he stated that we already have to support the sweetheart deals the state has made with the owners.

Regarding Laratta telling us to get over the Colts' move to Indianapolis: At least when we got the Browns (and this was made possible by his city stealing our Colts), we were man enough to let Cleveland keep the team name.

Wayne Spangler

Fallston

Call them 'Loose Cannons'

Albert Belle, Will Clark, a leaderless and undisciplined clubhouse, and, lastly, a weak and nonmotivating manager. I guess we ought to change the Orioles' name to the "Loose Cannons."

If anything, folks, there's an interesting season ahead.

Joseph Larson

Towson

Palineiro no big loss

Poor Rafael Palmeiro.

The Orioles hurt his feelings and Raffy decided to take his family and go home to Texas. As far as I'm concerned, the Orioles will be decidedly better in the long run without this big-game choker.

Sure, his regular-Season stats look very impressive, but, when thrust into the playoffs, I've never seen a so-called star look so pathetic in pressure situations. Who can forget his hapless at-bats against the Indians in 1997 when, time and again, he failed to produce even a groundout to the infield or a medium-depth fly ball to knock in a critical run?

If history is any indicator, we'll probably see Mr. Sensitivity five years from now when his contract expires. At age 39, when Texas refuses to resign him (again), Mr. Loyalty will be back in Baltimore saying how much he loves this town and wants to retire as an Oriole.

Morton D. Marcus

Baltimore

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