McKinley Wooden, 103, the last known surviving member of...

DEATHS ELSEWHERE

December 10, 1998

McKinley Wooden, 103, the last known surviving member of Harry S. Truman's World War I Army unit, died Sunday at a retirement community in Lee's Summit, Mo.

Rolando Alphonso, 67, the tenor saxophonist for the Skatalites and a major figure in Jamaican music, died Nov. 20 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. The cause of death was a brain hemorrhage, said his daughter.

George D. Crothers, 89, a producer of the long-running CBS television program "Lamp Unto My Feet" and a director of religious broadcasting at the network, died Nov. 27 in Sarasota, Fla.

Cardinal Carlos Oviedo, 71, a former archbishop of Santiago, Chile, died there Monday of a heart attack. The Catholic University Hospital said the prelate was admitted last week because of problems stemming from the neurological disorder that forced him to resign as archbishop in February.

Gyo Fujikawa, 90, author and illustrator of some of the first children's books to feature children of many races, died Nov. 26 in New York. Her books included "Babies" and "Baby Animals," which have sold a combined 1.3 million copies.

Paul Brooks, 89, a retired editor in chief and vice president of Houghton Mifflin Co., died Sunday in Bedford, Mass. He worked with such prominent authors as Sir Winston Churchill, Archibald MacLeish and Rachel Carson.

Pub Date: 12/10/98

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