'Miracle,' music, trains, lanes offer way into holidays

NEIGHBORS

December 04, 1998|By Peg Adamarczyk | Peg Adamarczyk,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

WHILE THE unusually dry and mild weather of the past few weeks has made outdoor decorating chores and trips to the mall easier, it hasn't done much to make us feel as if it's the Christmas season.

So, if you need something to jump-start your holiday feeling, several local events might help put you in the mood.

The Chesapeake High School Theatre Group presents the heartwarming holiday classic "Miracle on 34th Street" at 7 p.m. today and tomorrow in the school auditorium, 4798 Mountain Road.

Admission is $5 for adults and $4 for children age 10 and younger and for senior citizens.

"While most people are familiar with the movie versions of 'Miracle on 34th Street,' the play differs in many respects," said Linda Hall, group spokeswoman.

The story, set in post-World War II New York City, is about an elderly man from a retirement home who gets a job as Santa Claus at Macy's department store. He gets into trouble trying to help parents find toys by sending them to shop at a competitor's store -- after all, he is Kriss Kringle. This belief leads to a court competency hearing with a dramatic ending.

Tim Grieb plays Kriss Kringle, the elderly department store Santa Claus whose insistence that he is the genuine article leads to the dramatic court hearing. Eric Eaton is Mr. Sawyer, the villainous vocational counselor; Heather Schaughency plays Miss Mara, the state prosecutor, and George Johnson appears as Fred Gayley, Kringle's lawyer. Caitlin Gill, a Bodkin Elementary School pupil, plays Susan Walker, the pivotal young true believer.

Other cast members include Morgan Uebersax, Jonathan Hall, Beth Jester, Bryan Knappe, Alex Groff and six Bodkin Elementary pupils, Roxanne Skowran, Kara Weitzel, Lindsay Wilson, Alysia Doyle, Kristi Rains and Amanda Schwarzmann.

The production is directed by Tim Simmons and Bob Reichert. Rose Mullikin and Karen Simmons are the theater group advisers.

Others working on the production are Tyler Harding and Walt Glinowicki, stage crew advisers; Chris Bosma, carpentry; Jimmy Conrad and Lauren Heath, lighting; Jen Roth, props; Veronica Godfrey and Becky Oxenham, makeup; Chrissie Taylor, art; and Meagan Capitano, stage manager.

Information: 410-255-5234

Carols and cuisine

Magothy United Methodist Church, 3703 Mountain Road, will present a seasonal program of music and food at 6 p.m. Sunday in its fellowship hall.

The program, "Journey into Advent; Carols and Customs," will feature the adult and children's choirs, the handbell choir and its praise band.

Information: 410-255-2420.

On track

The trains are up and running at several locations in the county again this holiday season for Emmanuel Lutheran Church's sixth annual train gardens fund-raiser for the North County Emergency Outreach Network.

Church members and other volunteers build the layouts, operate the trains and sell raffle tickets.

The main train garden is at Glen Burnie Mall, 6711 Ritchie Highway. Smaller train gardens are on display at Just Cutting Up Barber Shop in Riviera Beach, Lauer's IGA on Edwin Raynor Boulevard, Wal-Mart on Crain Highway, the Medicine Shoppe on Fort Smallwood Road and Hobby Town USA in the Chesapeake Square Plaza.

Raffle tickets, with the grand prize a 4-foot-by-6-foot winter wonderland train garden and trolley, are $1 each or seven for $5.

Information: 410-255-4141.

Pins and riffs for teens

Pasadena Christian Teens group is sponsoring a "Rock 'n' Bowl" evening from 9: 30 p.m. to 12: 30 a.m. Dec. 29 at the Riviera Bowl on Fort Smallwood Road.

The evening is open to youth in grades six through 12.

The cost is $10 and includes three games of duckpin bowling, bowling shoes, a slice of pizza and soda.

Sphere's End will provide recorded Christian rock music.

Registrations will be accepted at the Riviera Bowl through Dec. 14.

Information: 410-439-0344.

Pub Date: 12/04/98

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