Barbara E. Stokes, 69, West Baltimore homemakerBarbara E...

October 08, 1998

Barbara E. Stokes, 69, West Baltimore homemaker

Barbara E. Stokes, a homemaker and West Baltimore resident, died Friday of cardiac arrest at Bon Secours Hospital. She was 69.

Born in Baltimore, the former Barbara Garey was educated in city schools. In 1950, she married Logan Emmitt Stokes, who died in 1982.

Mrs. Stokes was a former member of Pine Street Holiness Church and a member of Eastern United Methodist Church, 1429 E. North Ave., where services will be held at noon today.

She is survived two sons, James Stokes and Richard Stokes, and seven daughters, Tanya Stokes, Antoinette McCutcheon, Betty Stokes, Barbara Moore, Phyllis Moody, Glendora Lifsey and Joan Thornton, all of Baltimore; two stepsons, Raymond Stokes of Poughkeepsie, N.Y., and Linwood Stokes of Baltimore; three stepdaughters, Grace Pinkard of Chicago, Edmonia Savage of Poughkeepsie and Rebecca Stokes of Blackstone, Va.; 42 grandchildren; and 67 great-grandchildren.

John Beasley Myers, 80, chemical company executive

John Beasley Myers, a former chemical company executive, died of a stroke Saturday at his Annapolis home. He was 80.

He worked for Chevron Chemical Co. in Odenton for nearly 40 years, starting as a mechanical engineer and retiring as a vice president in 1982.

The Odenton native lived much of his life in the Linstead TC community of Severna Park before he moved to Annapolis about 10 years ago.

He graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1936 and received a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1940. He was a member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Johns Hopkins Club.

Services were private.

He is survived by his wife, the former Mary Frances Shipley, whom he married in 1947; a son, John Michael Myers of Severna Park; two daughters, Mary M. Dunn of Reston, Va., and Amy M. Cromwell of Atlanta; and seven grandchildren.

Pub Date: 10/08/98

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