Masterful articles are latest tribute to civil rights...

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

August 28, 1998

Masterful articles are latest tribute to civil rights leaders

Your editors and Linell Smith, whose series chronicled so caringly the lifting of Gwynn Oak's racial barriers, are to be commended for a masterfully thorough job ("Justice at Gwynn Oak," Aug. 23-24).

Lest some readers get the impression that the selfless work of this movement's activists went unrecognized before this, it should be known that a memorable tribute was paid to one of them 18 years ago. That day, the Rev. Chester Wickwire was honored by a large group of his friends and supporters for his lifelong contributions to social justice.

FOR THE RECORD - CORRECTION

At the time, the Johns Hopkins tutorial program was one of Mr. Wickwire's focal efforts.

Representatives of the area's political, cultural, educational and religious leadership were addressed by Arthur S. Fleming, then chairman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

Henry W. Eisner

Baltimore

This letter appeared yesterday with the wrong signature. We regret the error.

SEE CORRECT LETTER BELOW

Masterful articles are latest tribute to civil rights leaders

Your editors and Linell Smith, whose series chronicled so caringly the lifting of Gwynn Oak's racial barriers, are to be commended for a masterfully thorough job ("Justice at Gwynn Oak," Aug. 23-24).

Lest some readers get the impression that the selfless work of this movement's activists went unrecognized before this, it should be known that a memorable tribute was paid to one of them 18 years ago. That day, the Rev. Chester Wickwire was honored by a large group of his friends and supporters for his lifelong contributions to social justice.

At the time, the Johns Hopkins tutorial program was one of Mr. Wickwire's focal efforts. Representatives of the area's political, cultural, educational and religious leadership were addressed by Arthur S. Fleming, then chairman of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

George Goebel

Catonsville

Bombings and strikes grab the headlines; starvation is invisible

The world's attention and that of U.S. policy makers has been riveted in recent weeks on the embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania and subsequent U.S. reprisals in the Sudan and Afghanistan.

Another terror, however, stalks the land in the Sudan with horrendous consequences -- the terror of hunger and starvation.

Recent television reports show pictures of starving children and adults. Those starving children have bloated bellies and flies on their bodies. Sometimes their mothers hold them in thin arms with love but little help or hope.

Such images are documented by many independent agencies. The United Nations World Food Program now targets 2.6 million Sudanese people for famine relief aid, to be distributed through an umbrella arrangement called Operation Lifeline Sudan.

A United States Senate resolution adopted July 31 calls upon the president to "aggressively seek to secure emergency famine relief for the people of Sudan who now face widespread starvation." A July 22 congressional report states that 1.2 million Sudanese people are "on the brink of starvation."

The United States, as well as Sudan's warring factions, must not allow their differences to prevent emergency food aid from reaching starving, innocent people. Our national interest as a nation based on liberty and human decency is not only to oppose terrorism but also to pursue aggressive and determined action to feed the hungry and clothe the naked.

In this way, we continue to act upon our nation's shining creed of liberty, justice and compassion.

Rev. Sidney Daniels

John C. Springer

Baltimore

The writers are, respectively, pastor emeritus of Emmanuel Christian Community Church who serves as secretary to the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance, and the director of the Interfaith Action for Racial Justice Inc.

Howard Stern sends TV down the tubes

Jerry Springer move over, Howard Stern's late night television show has arrived on WJZ ("Batten down the hatches," Aug. 22).

From his degradation of a female body builder to his parody of Jon Benet Ramsey to his Frankenstein makeover contest, Mr. Stern stirs our lowest instincts with a big stick. And the more he stirs, the more it stinks.

Rick Mason

Ellicott City

Lewinsky matter will lead to isolated presidency

We have learned the special grand jury process is neither special or grand, and it certainly isn't secret. When operated by someone with absolute power, that person can void individual rights by abusing the legal system with threats, confinement, power of immunity, public disclosures, hearsay, finger-pointing, false impressions and press leaks.

Because special prosecutors can summon the president's advisers, bodyguards, secretaries, friends, cabinet members and military to divulge the contents of private conversations, who are presidents going to trust?

The views of presidents' spouses will become more important than ever. Spouses will be the only people in whom presidents can confide. Is an isolated president a good thing? Absolutely not.

Alex P. Gross

Owings Mills

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