A fresh coat of paint

Home Front

July 05, 1998|By Karol V. Menzie | Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff

Bob Timberlake, a popular realist artist whose paintings, furniture and textiles re-create the casually chic atmosphere and tints of his home and its Lexington, N.C., setting, has developed a line of paints for the home called the Bob Timberlake Coatings and Colors Collection. There are four color collections in the line of interior and exterior paints and stains: Garden Path, Summer Day, Harvest and Cabin. They are available in the Baltimore area at Budeke's Paints in Fells Point, Owings Mills, Timonium and Perry Hall.

Think green in the garden

Did you know that having a green thumb doesn't necessarily make you a "green" gardener -- one who protects the environment? That's because some routine practices -- including cutting the grass, watering and fertilizing the lawn, and experimenting with new seed types -- aren't all that good for the planet.

Here are some tips from the ULS Report (Use Less Stuff) on helping the environment when gardening:

* If you have a big yard, you might want to invest in a mulching mower, which reduces lawn trimmings and is good for the grass.

* Use ground cover or shrubs to reduce the area you mow. This will also provide habitat and food for beneficial garden creatures, such as butterflies and bees.

* Check all watering equipment to make sure you're not wasting water; adjust sprinklers so you're not watering walks or driveways.

* Water in the early morning or in the evening to minimize evaporation.

* Plant things that are native to your area; they'll require less care.

* Save old seeds; raising new ones depletes resources such as water and space. Many old seeds have a shelf life of two to three years. Some, such as lettuce or cucumber, last even longer.

* Cut down on fungicide use by avoiding over-watering; before you try pesticides, spray aphids and other pests with soapy water. Attract slugs with a shallow pan of white vinegar.

(The bimonthly ULS Report is a publication of Partners for Environmental Progress. It is free; for a copy, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to the ULS Report, P.O. Box 130116, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48113

Small victories in the yard

There are small lawn mowers, and then there are small lawn mowers - like LawnPup, which is the perfect size for the tiny yards that lie behind many a Baltimore rowhouse. A product of GrassMasters Inc. of Barrington, Ill., LawnPup has a deck measuring just 13 inches. It weighs just 23 pounds, has a 9.1 amp electric motor and is made of durable plastic. When you're through mowing, you can fold it up and store it in a closet. Suggested retail price is about $180. The LawnPup is available in specialty catalogs such as Brookstone and the Sharper Image, at some Ace and True Value hardware stores, and at some home and garden centers. It's also available on the QVC shopping channel. Or you can order directly from the factory. To order, or for more information, call toll-free 877-LAWNPUP.

EVENT:

The domestic art of addressing letters is not dead - at least not at the Smithsonian Institution's National Postal Museum. Colette Roberts of Columbia and Suzanne Heany of Severna Park were two of 75 winners in the museum's Graceful Envelope contest, which celebrates the museum's fifth anniversary. Artists and calligraphers were invited to submit envelope designs that celebrate the gentle art of letter writing -- sent in through the mail, of course. More than 260 entries were submitted, and the 75 winning envelopes are on view at the museum, at the Washington City Post Office Building, 2 Massachusetts Ave. N.E., Washington. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. seven days a week. Admission is free.

Home Front welcomes interesting tidbits of home and garden news. Please send suggestions to Karol V. Menzie, Home Front, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278, or fax to 410-783-2519.

Pub Date: 7/05/98

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