Storm topples power lines and trees

July 01, 1998|By Jacques Kelly DTC | Jacques Kelly DTC,SUN STAFF

A brief but powerful summer squall accompanied by 50-mph winds raced through Frederick, Carroll, Howard, Harford and Baltimore counties and Baltimore City yesterday evening, toppling trees and cutting electrical power to some 34,000 users.

"It was a hairy early evening for a while," said Chris Strong of the National Weather Service in Sterling, Va. "The storm was ahead of a cold front that'll make Wednesday less humid."

Police agencies received numerous reports of fallen trees and downed wires as the storm, which lasted about 10 minutes, rolled through the area about 7 p.m.

Winds clocked at 58 mph in Hagerstown uprooted trees in Lisbon in western Howard County. There were reports of hail three-quarters of an inch in diameter in Carroll County. Baltimore-Washington International Airport reported winds at 30 mph. Rainfall was slight.

Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. spokesman Karl Neddenien said that 22,000 customers were still without power at 10: 45 p.m. Most of the outages were concentrated in Howard and Baltimore counties, he said.

"We've got 100 people out there working, and we will stick with it until everything is repaired," said Neddenien.

Carroll County emergency units responded to a call for help when a tree fell on a house in the 6800 block of Marriottsville Road in Sykesville. The storm toppled trees and cut electrical wires in the Mount Airy and Union Bridge areas.

The Baltimore Fire Department answered calls for downed power lines in Northwood, Roland Park, Charles Village, Waverly, and Hampden.

Electric and telephone lines came down in Oella, Kingsville, Pikesville, Owings Mills, Reisterstown, Hebbville and Woodlawn in Baltimore County.

The storm battered western Howard County, where the Fire Department reported trees down along Trotter, Rover Mill and Jennings Chapel roads.

Pub Date: 7/01/98

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