Mill works

Home Front

June 21, 1998|By Karol V. Menzie | Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff

Handmade quilts are the focus of a new shop in Historic Savage Mill, but they're not all that's there. You can find handcrafts of all kinds, including framed folk-art prints, architectural sculptures, baskets, rugs, quilt racks, ceramics and scented candles. In addition, there are handmade "Front Porch" pillows made of vintage fabric by shop owner Kathleen Branch. The store will celebrate its grand opening Saturday and next Sunday. The address is 8600 Foundry Road, Savage. The phone number is 301-490-5410.

How to clean a quilt

Have an old or antique quilt that needs cleaning? Here are some tips from Country Living magazine. Some quilts can be washed at home, with care. Make sure the quilt is made of cotton and is still in good condition, with sturdy stitches and intact fabric and batting. Test first for colorfastness: Find an unobtrusive spot and place a drop of water on the fabric, then press firmly with a white blotter. Check several spots and repeat with a little water mixed with detergent. If no color appears on the blotter, the quilt can be washed. Here's the procedure:

* Soak the quilt for about 30 minutes in a bathtub filled with lukewarm water. Drain the water, without removing the quilt, and then refill, adding about half a cup of mild, liquid dish detergent such as Ivory. Gently agitate from time to time for about 30 minutes. Drain and refill the tub with cool water several times until all evidence of soap is rinsed away.

* If bleaching is necessary, use half a cup per half-tubful of water of a diluted solution of oxygen bleach (such as Clorox 2). Soak for about 15 to 20 minutes, then repeat the detergent bath and rinse. (Remember that old stains may be set for good, and trying too zealously to remove them can damage the quilt.)

* Gently squeeze out excess water - do not wring the quilt. Lay the quilt out flat on absorbent towels and lightly press out as much water as you can.

* On bright, dry days, you may dry the quilt outdoors. Place it face-down on a sheet or a cotton mattress pad and out of direct sunlight. Cover with another cotton sheet. To dry a quilt indoors, lay it flat on towels and aim an electric fan over the surface. Never place a quilt on a line to dry, as uneven distribution of weight can weaken the fabric and stitching. -K.M

EVENTS:

* You can learn about ikebana, the ancient Japanese art of flower arranging, during a demonstration today in the Yoshimura Center of the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum at the U.S. National Arboretum in northeast Washington. The free demonstration, by a member of the local chapter of Ikebana International, takes place from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Arboretum entrances are on New York Avenue and R Street Northeast, off Bladensburg Road. For more information, call 202-245-2726.

Fancy coffee

If you love the taste of today's fancy coffee drinks, but find the steam-blasting machines that make them a little intimidating, Black & Decker comes to the rescue with Expresso Mio, a new device that makes espresso in just two minutes in a standard microwave oven. With an accessory frothing device, you can create such coffee drinks as cappuccino, mocha and latte. The device costs $19.99; a kit with the frother increases the price to $29.99. Expresso Mio is available at department stores, mass merchandisers and discount stores. For retail locations, call 800-231-9786.

Pub Date: 6/21/98

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