Earl Arthur Fisk, 77, Army officerEarl Arthur Fisk, a...

June 13, 1998

Earl Arthur Fisk, 77, Army officer

Earl Arthur Fisk, a retired Army officer and former civilian employee at Aberdeen Proving Ground, died Wednesday of pancreatic cancer at Charlestown Retirement Community. He was 77.

He enlisted in the Army in 1939 and was an artilleryman in North Africa, Sicily and Italy during World War II. He was discharged with the rank of technical sergeant.

He re-enlisted in 1948 and served in Korea with the Signal Corps. He later served in Japan and Germany and retired with the rank of major in 1962.

That year, he joined the Department of Defense as a civilian employee assigned to the development and proof section at Aberdeen, where much of his work was of a classified nature. He retired in 1982.

Born in Kittery Point, Maine, the son of a Baptist minister, he grew up in Ohio, where his father was pastor of several churches.

There are no services.

He is survived by his wife of 56 years, the former Harriett Foresman; a brother, Evan Fisk of Sebring, Fla.; and a sister, Ellen Latonick of Binghamton, N.Y.

Leo Buscaglia, 74, speaker, author of self-help books

Self-help author Leo Buscaglia, a bearded, teddy bear-like apostle of love who customarily ended his motivational speeches by giving everyone in the audience a hug, died of a heart attack yesterday at his home on the shores of Lake Tahoe. He was 74.

Known as "Dr. Hug," he shook up the University of Southern California in the 1970s when he started classes on love, including "Love 101," combining sociology and psychology. His first book, "Love," which came out in 1972, examined human love as the one unifying force in life.

Buscaglia wrote more than a dozen books that sold more than 11 million copies in 20 languages. Among them were "Loving Each Other" and "Living, Loving and Learning." At one time, five of his books appeared on the New York Times best-seller list. His most recent book was "Love Cookbook" in 1994.

Buscaglia got his start as a supervisor of special education in the Pasadena, Calif., schools from 1960 to 1965 and was an education professor at the University of Southern California from 1975 to 1984.

Pub Date: 6/13/98

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.