Md. labor chief resigns for job in White House Conti is second in 6 weeks to leave Glendening team

June 06, 1998|By William F. Zorzi Jr. | William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF

Gov. Parris N. Glendening's secretary of labor, licensing and regulation, Eugene A. Conti Jr., resigned yesterday, becoming the second Cabinet-level member of the administration to quit in less than six weeks.

Conti, 51, who has been Maryland's labor secretary for nearly three years, told Glendening in his letter of resignation that he was leaving the $100,500-a-year post to take an unspecified position with the Clinton White House.

Neither Glendening's office nor Conti's office would say where he will serve in Clinton's administration. Spokesmen for Glendening and the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation said the White House was not prepared to announce the appointment.

Before joining the state, Conti worked in Washington in a variety of capacities -- as a deputy assistant secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation, budget examiner at the Office of Management and Budget and program manager at the Department of the Treasury. He also was chief of staff to former U.S. Rep. David E. Price, a North Carolina Democrat.

Conti of Chevy Chase left town yesterday and could not be reached for comment. His resignation is effective July 3.

The Glendening administration downplayed the significance of Conti's leaving, particularly in light of the recent resignation of James T. Brady as Maryland's secretary of economic and business development.

Brady, a 57-year-old former businessman from Baltimore, quit in April, citing sharp differences with Glendening over several of the governor's decisions. This week he said he was exploring a race for governor against Glendening.

"Gene's absolutely not upset or disappointed with the governor," said Karen Napolitano, spokeswoman for labor, licensing and regulation. "He is not leaving out of any sense of frustration or disappointment."

Pub Date: 6/06/98

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