Doris M. Brown, 75, active in charitable, social groups

May 12, 1998|By Robert Hilson Jr. | Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF

Doris M. Brown, a Baltimore native who was active in numerous city charitable and social organizations during the 1950s and 1960s, died Wednesday of heart failure at her Mount Vernon home.

Mrs. Brown, 75, lived in the Ashburton section of West Baltimore for much of her life and was known for holding large parties with her first husband, Dr. Marcus W. Moore, a local surgeon.

She was a founding member of the Smart Set, an organization that consisted mainly of the wives of black professionals who devoted time to charities.

"She was always one of the most gracious and graceful people I have known," said Jean Wilkerson, a friend who worked with Mrs. Brown on many social events. "She was a tireless worker and was so down to earth."

Mrs. Brown was known for her willingness to help charitable causes.

Many of the functions held at her Sequoia Avenue home were community-oriented, or were held to help plan for local programs, friends said.

She also was an active member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and the Baltimore chapter of the Urban League.

"They did things to help the community and were well-respected," said Herbert Nutter, a longtime family friend.

Her daughter, Marilyn Armour Bennett of Amelia Island, Fla., said her mother made it a point to make guests in their home feel comfortable.

"She didn't have to put on airs," she said.

A native of Baltimore and the youngest of nine children, the former Doris Moseley graduated from Frederick Douglass High School in about 1940. She married Dr. Moore in 1942; they divorced in 1967. She married Walter Brown in the early 1970s; they divorced in 1974.

She worked as an administrative assistant for the Social Security Administration at the Woodlawn and downtown offices from the mid-1970s until the mid-1980s.

After she retired, she moved to Westminster House, a downtown apartment building, where she worked greeting new residents and visitors. She also volunteered at the Enoch Pratt Free Library.

Friends and family members said Mrs. Brown loved playing games, and was especially good at Scrabble, "Jeopardy!", bridge and pinochle. She was also skilled at crossword puzzles.

Private services were held.

In addition to her daughter, she is survived by a son, Marcus Moore Jr. of New York; and a grandson.

Pub Date: 5/12/98

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