Seeding gives Terps incentive Maryland looks for way to redirect bad weekend

May 09, 1998|By JAMISON HENSLEY AND KATHERINE DUN

Some might consider it cruel luck. Maryland believes it's a wake-up call.

The Terrapins (11-2) ended their regular season with their worst performance of the year in an upset loss at UMBC.

A day later, the Maryland players sat together in the football team complex to see the NCAA tournament selection show.

They waited. And they waited. It seems that the connection to Home Team Sports was fouled up and coach Dick Edell had to call in for the pairings.

But maybe it proved best that Maryland didn't watch. The Terps, who were convinced they would be included among the top four spots, listened in disbelief as Edell told them that they received a No. 5 seed and would play Butler at Homewood Field in the first round.

"It felt like the wheels came off right then," said defenseman Mike Bonanni, the Terps' first two-time captain in Edell's 15 years at Maryland.

L "It definitely wasn't a great weekend for Maryland lacrosse.

"We were upset by the loss and disappointed by the seed. But we have to channel that negative energy.

"It might be a blessing that all this happened now. In the tournament, there's no tomorrow."

Hoyas more poised

When Georgetown plays No. 8 UMBC tomorrow at Homewood Field, the Hoyas expect their second NCAA appearance to be a lot smoother than their first.

In the program's first NCAA tournament game last year, Georgetown showed jitters from the start as Maryland raced to a 6-0 first-quarter lead, holding the Hoyas out of its attack area for the first 10 minutes of the game and not allowing a shot until the 11: 12 mark.

Coincidentally, UMBC will be making its tournament debut against the Hoyas this year.

"I think with how Maryland came out, combined with our nervousness, led to the inauspicious start," Georgetown coach Dave Urick said.

"I'd like to think we've learned from that and have more poise and confidence."

Goucher milestone

Goucher's Kristin Carey (Towson) has moved into second place on the NCAA Division III all-time goal-scoring list.

With a five-goal, four-assist performance in her final game, a 14-13 win over Frostburg last weekend, Carey boosted her career goals total to 251. Julie Noyes, a 1995 Swarthmore graduate, holds the record with 278 goals.

Carey, the only player among the Division III top 10 goal scorers still active in 1998, also moved past former Gopher Courtney Crangi to become Goucher's all-time leader in points. Her 360 career points also rank her fourth on the all-time Division III list.

Big Green machine

Dartmouth's rise to the No. 4 seed in the NCAA tournament came behind major contributions from three Baltimore natives.

Jacque Weitzel, Kate Graw and Emily Fenwick have helped the Big Green go 12-2, losing only to No. 3 Maryland and No. 1 North Carolina.

Weitzel, a Garrison Forest graduate, scored seven goals in last week's 13-12 loss to North Carolina. The effort earned her Ivy League Offensive Player of the Week honors for the third time this season. With 56 goals and seven assists, the sophomore ranks second in the nation in goals per game (4.0).

Graw, a defensive midfielder from Severn, has contributed 21 goals and four assists. She had four assists in Sunday's 19-4 win over Columbia to clinch the Ivy League title for the Big Green.

Fenwick, a Reisterstown native who attended St. George's, R.I., is third in scoring with 23 goals and 11 assists.

Super seniors

The seniors on Maryland's women's team could become the first Division I lacrosse players ever to win a national title in each year of their college careers.

The Terps' four-year players -- Cathy Nelson, Sascha Newmarch, Noelle Mitchell, Kathleen Lund and Annamarie Piccioni -- have been part of an unprecedented string of three straight titles. They have a 7-0 record in the NCAA tournament and have outscored tournament opponents, 64-30, over three years.

Pub Date: 5/09/98

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