Construction of jail addition falls a month behind schedule Undetected rubble at site caused delay, general contractor says

May 08, 1998|By Mike Farabaugh | Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF

Construction of a $6.1 million addition to the Carroll County jail, delayed about eight years in the design stage, is behind schedule by at least a month, a contractor said yesterday.

Clark Delauter, job site superintendent for CJF Inc., the general contractor, said an excavation snag made it necessary to seek an extension from the county on the expected completion date of Feb. 22.

The county and general contractor have not agreed on the length of an extension, but Delauter said pouring of concrete footings for the steel girders should have begun April 10.

A dozen test borings, typically done 12 to 20 feet below grade, failed to detect tons of concrete and brick rubble buried 2 to 20 feet below the surface and caused the excavation snag, Delauter said.

The number of truckloads of debris that had to be hauled away from the site, just north of the Carroll County Detention Center at 100 N. Court St., was uncertain, but "100 loads would be a pretty good guesstimate," he said.

Barring weather delays, the excavated site -- formerly a parking lot -- would be at grade level by today, and subcontractors could begin pouring the concrete footers Monday, Delauter said.

"The security doors and steel [beams] are on hold [for delivery] in about two weeks," he said.

County officials had expected a December completion date during the planning stage, said Tom Rio, chief of the county's Bureau of Building Construction.

"The contract allowed for one year to finish construction, and the contract was signed in February," he said.

The county is doing its best to keep the contractor on schedule, Rio said.

"That's why we decided to use our workers and trucks to haul away the rubble and bring in the crushed-stone fill, rather than rely on another subcontractor," he said. "We felt we could get it done faster."

Pub Date: 5/08/98

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