Three charged in shootings, suspected in car thefts

March 27, 1998|BY A SUN STAFF WRITER

An investigation into a string of car thefts in a North Baltimore neighborhood has ended with the arrests of three young men and led to suspects in two shootings, one of a pizza shop clerk, police said yesterday.

The arrests were made March 20 after police said they saw three people in a stolen car on MacBeth Drive in Cedarcroft. Other charges related to a shooting were filed this week after an investigation, said Northern District Lt. Paul Abell.

One of the young men had a 9 mm Ruger semiautomatic handgun when he was caught, Abell said. After questioning each suspect, police said they linked the trio to 10 more car thefts and found a house in which several stolen car radios were being stored.

Abell said all three were charged yesterday with a shooting last week in the 1300 block of Limit Ave., in which a teen-ager was wounded four times by people who had waited for him to return home.

Police said the victim is a member of a suspect's gang who apparently argued over who would get to keep the proceeds of a recent robbery. The victim was in critical condition yesterday at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.

Abell said that one of the youths gave detectives the name of a young suspect in the shooting of a Little Caesar's clerk who was wounded during a recent robbery in the 1100 block of Elbank Ave. in the same neighborhood. That suspect has been charged in an arrest warrant as a juvenile.

The arrested suspects were identified as Michael Dubye, 16, of the 1000 block of E. Lake Ave.; Devron Langly, 17, of the 3100 block of MacBeth Drive; and Ronald Wingfield, 20, of the 1000 block of Woodson Road.

Abell said each has been charged with attempted first-degree murder, assault, burglary and use of a handgun in the commission of a crime.

They were being held without bail yesterday at the Central Booking and Intake Center.

Pub Date: 3/27/98

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