Thomas Hardy

March 01, 1998|By The Literary Almanac

Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), was born in Dorset, England, to common rural folk. His mother taught him to read at three and by the time he finished grammar school, he knew the classics, French, and German. In 1856, he was apprenticed to a Dorchester and then a London architect, but despite winning awards, he was determined to be a writer. Hardy published his first novel at 31. His simple origins proved indispensable to his writing. His empathetic depiction of country people in The Return of the Native (1878) and Tess of the D'Urbervilles (1891) LTC won him readers, and condemnation - from the public and his wife - who believed them to be amoral. Today his books feel modern and his work remains important to English literature.

Pub Date: 3/01/98

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