150 years ago in The SunMarch 1: The Broadway Race Course...

This Week

March 01, 1998|By Fred Rasmussen

150 years ago in The Sun

March 1: The Broadway Race Course -- The inconvenience to the neighborhood of Broadway, caused by the use of that street for a trotting course by some persons, has caused high constable Gifford to station officers in the neighborhood, in order to arrest the offending parties.

March 7: Port of Baltimore -- Our wharves are well filled with shipping at this time; seldom so many vessels in port at once, and business looks well. The shipping presented a beautiful appearance yesterday, with their flags and streamers flying at half-mast.

100 years ago in The Sun

March 4: St. Ignatius Catholic Church, Calvert and Madison streets, was yesterday morning the scene of an impressive mass of requiem, celebrated for the repose of the souls of the men who perished on the Maine.

March 5: FEMININE PEN NAMES -- Why do women adopt masculine pen names? Is it because, after all, we have the sense of humor men deny us and that little spice of malice we refuse to acknowledge, that the most feminine of writers pass their sentimentalities upon an ingenuous world as the maunderings of manly intellect? Not all women who write under masculine pseudonyms betray their sex or reflect on the other.

50 years ago in The Sun

March 1: Reuben R. Kramer, of 2323 Linden Avenue, yesterday was awarded the $500 grand prize of the sixteenth annual All Maryland Artists Exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art.

March 2: Baltimore should have a zoo commensurate with its size -- not necessarily large, but representative, Arthur R. Watson said yesterday as he took over his duties as the new director of the Druid Hill Park Zoo.

March 6: Hamilton R. Atkinson, police commissioner, announced yesterday that the "kidnapping" of a young man at Thirty-third Street and Old York Road Thursday afternoon was a hoax by high-school students.

Pub Date: 3/01/98

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.