Questions remain in the Young caseA. B. Jones' Jan. 16...

Letters

January 23, 1998

Questions remain in the Young case

A. B. Jones' Jan. 16 commentary hit the nail on the head ("Young defenders should save protests for the real victims").

He asked a lot of legitimate questions which should be answered by former Sen. Larry Young. I have some more.

Who paid for the luxury, 46-passenger, restroom-equipped motor coaches to transport his supporters to Annapolis, when 55- to 60-passenger-type school buses would have cost half as much for the 60-mile round trip?

Were these supporters paid to go to Annapolis?

The Sun should be commended for bringing this fiasco to the attention of the public.

I hope criminal charges will be brought if further investigations deem them appropriate.

Guy Hall

Glen Burnie

Clinton is the key to Middle East peace

The Middle East negotiations have crumbled and peace in that vital region is receding.

The peace process isn't helped by West Bank settlements, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's focus on his political survival, Chairman Yasser Arafat's unwillingness to prevent terrorism, and the many broken promises on both sides.

In contrast to Yitzhak Rabin's courage and visionary leadership, which created momentum for peace, Mr. Netanyahu seems intent on snatching defeat from the jaws of victory.

At this point, only the president of the United States has the ability and the strength to be the catalyst for mutual recognition, respect and an agreement that provides peace with security.

All parties must be encouraged to live up to the Oslo accords.

Roger C. Kostmayer

Baltimore

Castro and the pope cannot be compared

As a Catholic Cuban-American, I read with interest Colman McCarthy's Jan. 18 Perspective column, "What do John Paul and Fidel Castro have in common?"

I was disappointed and flabbergasted by the comparison between Pope John Paul II and Fidel Castro. There are huge differences: Castro reached power by force and remains in power through a strong security apparatus that stifles opposition; the pope was elected to his post by long-honored tradition, has no security apparatus and his opinions are followed by the power of moral authority.

Disagreeing with Castro can land you in jail, close the door to jobs, university education and other opportunities and, in many cases, force the dissenter to exile; disagreeing with the pope will result only in Vatican disapproval if you are a member of the staff.

To liken Fidel Castro to John Paul is absurd, inappropriate and intellectually insulting.

Jesus Leon

Ellicott City

Will Brazilian 'Lucy' speak Spanish?

The People and Places column Jan. 7 included a report that Brazilian star Xuxa will revive the role of Lucy Ricardo in a "Spanish production" of the 1950s television series. Brazilians, however, speak Portuguese.

William Smith

Baltimore

Cigar makers not alone in seducing consumers

Now that The Sun has fearlessly exposed "one of the 20th century's great but shadowy marketing campaigns" in the "Cigar Caper" series (Jan. 11 to 13), it should examine a not-so-shadowy marketing campaign that goes on under our very noses.

As an accursed and abused cigar smoker of 30 years (good cigars only, I might add), I am shocked -- shocked -- to discover that playgrounds and the seductive Bozo symbol of a fun-loving, hamburger-happy clown are being used as lures in a "long-range plan" to make children eat health-threatening fried foods laden with fat, grease and salt.

I have witnessed these innocent children (escorted by guilty sidekick adults who should know better) devouring these nutritionless, heart-attacking fast foods in reckless fashion -- day after day, and long into the night.

I might also add that I remember smoking cigars (inspired by none other than H. L. Mencken) in the hallowed sanctuary of the Evening Sun's newsroom when I was a cub reporter there in the early 1960s.

Shocking, but absolutely true.

John Sherwood

Severna Park

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