Decision to pull Angelou's book not a racial oneThe...

LETTERS

January 18, 1998

Decision to pull Angelou's book not a racial one

The removal of the Maya Angelou book "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" from the Anne Arundel County ninth-grade curriculum was a fair and open decision.

I believe parents have a right to control what their children read at that age. I do not believe that the parents first checked to see if the author was black before determining that they did not want the book read by their children.

I do not understand how the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People can make this a racial issue.

Albert M. Harris

Towson

Too much time lost to bomb threats

As I was driving by George Fox Middle School one recent Wednesday morning, I saw my two sons standing in the baseball field across the street in the rain.

I didn't have to wonder what was wrong. I saw the police and the big black dog. I saw the same police and the same big black dog just the day before, and the day before that, at Northeast High School, where my other son was standing outside of the school instead of being in class.

A new year, a new bomb threat.

I am sick and tired of these kid terrorists. What are we to do about the terrorists holding our children hostage? What is going to happen when someone gets hurt during the evacuation of a school? Who is paying for the police, the bomb squad, the big black dog?

Something must be done.

While eating dinner with my wife and four sons, I was expressing my anger and frustration with this matter when the answer came to me: Caning; public caning at the school where the bomb threat was made.

I remember an article a while back that had everyone in an uproar. It was about the caning of a young man in Singapore for spray-painting a couple of cars. I'll bet he can't walk past a can of spray paint without his behind hurting.

My wife and sons thought this was a little much, but let's at least try it and see if it works. I also told my sons that if they ever did anything of this nature, I would cane them on the spot.

T. F. Wright

Pasadena

If racetrack is approved, county voters will hit back

Even though they are facing re-election in the fall, Anne Arundel County Council Chairman Bert L. Rice and County Executive John G. Gary are considering lending their support to the Middle River Racing Association's dangerously unpopular request to change county zoning laws to reduce the number of public hearings and appeals for the proposed project.

The MRRA asked county officials for a zoning law change that would classify auto racetracks as a conditional use on industrial land.

That change would mean the developers would not have to go through time-consuming appearances before the county's administrative hearing officer and Board of Appeals.

Instead, the developers would face a single public hearing before the County Council to change the zoning laws. A decision by the council on the zoning law change could not be appealed to the Board of Appeals.

This idea is akin to committing assisted political suicide.

The residents, homeowners, taxpayers and voters in Russett and Maryland City said no to the proposed Redskins Stadium. jTC We "just say no" to NASCAR on the noise, ground, water and air pollution that a $100 million, 54,800-seat auto racetrack next to our communities, families and homes would bring.

Election year? Our political voices are growing bigger and stronger every day. We have put down roots, our homes are here, our votes count. Money may talk loudly to Anne Arundel Economic Development Corp., but how many votes do it and the racetrack developer have on Election Day?

Marcia A. Stutzman

Laurel

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The Middle River Racing Association's desire to build a NASCAR racetrack adjacent to the residential community of Russett is totally absurd. It is more bizarre than the Redskins stadium folly.

Politicians had better understand that they will not be re-elected if they approve bypassing the zoning process and support such ludicrous ventures.

Elected officials need to listen to the residents. We value the quality of life in our community. We will not sell our souls for a few new paved roads.

ary E. Cooper

Laurel

Pub Date: 1/18/98

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