Isaac Bashevis Singer

January 18, 1998|By The Literary Almanac

(1904-1991) was born in Radzymin, Poland, the son and a grandson of Hasidic rabbis and the brother of the novelists LTC Joshua Singer and Esther Kreitman. He spent his youth in Warsaw and Bilgoray, a Jewish shtetl, and worked first as a proofreader and translator. In 1935, he emigrated to the United States, and under the influence of his brother, became a journalist for New York's Jewish Daily Forward. Singer started writing in Hebrew, but soon turned to Yiddish; he is the last great Yiddish author. His autobiographical novel, "The Family Moskat," was published in 1950 and was followed by humorous and mystical short stories, reflections on traditional Poland, children's tales and novels on modern America. Singer was awarded the 1978 Nobel Prize for Literature.

Pub Date: 1/18/98

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.