DeMatha races to romp over Broadneck Six former Bruins honored, but Stags too tough, 70-49

Boys basketball

December 21, 1997|By Pat O'Malley | Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF

Had Broadneck found a way to dress the four former boys Players of the Year whose numbers were honored last night in Cape St. Claire, it might have helped.

After all, DeMatha was in town.

Ranked No. 1 by the Washington Post, the Stags (8-0) are one of the best high school teams not just in Maryland, but the country. After their 70-49 romp over No. 17 Broadneck (1-3), the Bruins aren't about to dispute the claim.

DeMatha did not play its best, but still won by 21, although Broadneck gets some credit for that.

"This was a good workout for us," said DeMatha coach Morgan Wootten. "Broadneck played hard and we needed a game like this."

Prior to last night's tip-off, the Bruins unveiled banners with the names and numbers of four former Sun boys Players of the Year and two girls standouts as they officially dedicated their new 1,600-seat gym.

Those honored were Kenny Wood (1989), Matt Campbell (1990), Jason Smith (1995) and John Williams (1997), in addition to a pair of former girls stars in Brooke Smith and Betsy Given. Smith and Given were key players on the Bruins' back-to-back (1988-89 and 1989-90) state champions.

Coach Ken Kazmarek could have used them all last night.

"This is the deepest club we've ever had," said Wootten.

Now that's saying something, considering that Wootten is running neck and neck with Bob Hughes of Fort Worth, Texas, for the most wins in national high school history. After last night, Wootten, who coached the likes of Adrian Dantley and Danny Ferry, is 1,130-170 (.869) in his 42nd season.

Blue-chip juniors Joe Forte and Keith Bogans led the Stags with 20 and 15 points, respectively. Ten Stags scored as the visitors shot 54 percent (28-of-52) from the floor.

The Stags hit 10-of-14 field-goal attempts in the first period, with Bogans and Forte combining for 15 points and a 22-15 lead. After hitting 7-of-12 in the first period, the Bruins came unraveled and hit only 1-of-9 from the floor in the second period to fall behind 37-20 at the half.

To their credit, the Bruins came out fired up for the second half. Junior point guard Lehrman Dotson fired in three three-pointers in the third period and went on to finish with a team-high 19 points, 15 in the second half.

"I thought we played really hard, and that's what I wanted out of this," said Kazmarek. "We could have been blown out by 50, but our kids stepped it up in the second half."

Keith Williams, Brooks Barnard and Tremayne Williams tossed in seven points each as the undersized Bruins played their hearts out.

Broadneck's biggest player, Earl Downs, who is 6 feet 3 and 205 pounds, did not play for academic reasons, Kazmarek said.

Downs was sorely missed considering that DeMatha got six points and four boards from 6-9 sophomore Andre Scott, has a pair of 6-10 players, a 7-3 sophomore in Matt Salanika (did not score) and Bogans is 6-5 and Forte 6-3.

Still the Bruins were only out-rebounded by 23-15, but had only five caroms on the offensive side. Second shots were practically non-existent.

"Overall I'm pretty darned pleased with the way we played," said Kazmarek, who has his smallest team since 1988. "Certainly we can't run with a team like DeMatha, but I thought we used the [slower] tempo to our advantage and our younger kids needed a game like this.

"Our kids don't understand how good they can be."

Broadneck is the second Sun top 20 team knocked off by DeMatha this week. On Wednesday, the Stags rolled to an 80-57 triumph at No. 13 Loyola.

Spalding 59, Lithonia 55: Derrick Goode scored 13 points and Tremaine Robinson 11 as the No. 10 Cavaliers (7-1) defeated Lithonia, the eighth-ranked team in Georgia, at the Reebok Holiday Classic Tournament in Las Vegas.

Pub Date: 12/21/97

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