Trivia treat

November 27, 1997

HERE ARE a few footnotes on World War I. The A group is less taxing than the B group, which is for serious Great War junkies.

People

A) Baron Manfred von Richthofen. was the war's top-scoring air ace and, thanks to the ''Peanuts'' cartoon, may be its best-remembered figure. The real Red Baron racked up 80 victories before being shot down and killed in 1918.

B) Expatriate American Gene Bullard was heavily decorated for bravery in the French Foreign Legion, then transferred to the French air force and became the world's first black fighter pilot.

Places

A) On the Western Front was found the war's dominant image -- multiple lines of parallel trenches stretching from the Belgian coast through France all the way to the Swiss Alps.

B) On the remote island of Diego Garcia in the Indian Ocean, a French resident gave gifts of food to crewmen of the German cruiser Emden in October 1914 -- unaware that war had broken out two months earlier.

Things

A) Tanks, an invention inspired by Winston Churchill, made their debut in World War I.

B) In 1918, German troops bombarded Paris with the longest-range cannon ever built. The so-called Paris Gun fired shells 74 miles -- nearly three times the range of guns on the U.S. battleships used during the Persian Gulf War.

Quick Quiz

A. Which one of these future U.S. generals did not serve on the Western Front?

1. George C. Marshall

2. Dwight D. Eisenhower

3. George S. Patton Jr

4. Douglas MacArthur

B. Who fought against whom?

Britain, Romania, Germany, Japan, Turkey, Portugal, France, Belgium, Austria-Hungary, United States, Bulgaria, Italy, Serbia, Russia.

Answers:

A. 2, Dwight Eisenhower.

B. The Triple Entente: United States, Britain, France, Russia, Japan, Portugal, Belgium, Italy, Serbia, Romania; The Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, Bulgaria.

This first appeared in the Dallas Morning News.

Pub Date: 11/27/97

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