Troop 424 produces another Eagle: Scout Timothy Cezar in spotlight

NEIGHBORS

October 31, 1997|By Lourdes Sullivan | Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

The Sun incorrectly reported yesterday the time of the Savage United Methodist Church ham and oyster dinner. The dinner begins at 3 p.m. today at the church, 9050 Baltimore St., Savage, and continues through the afternoon. Tickets for the dinner and a crafts fair that begins at 2 p.m. are $10 for adults, $5 for children.

The Sun regrets the errors.

ANOTHER SAVAGE Boy Scout made Eagle last week. There have been 10 Eagles in the 51-year history of Troop 424, based in Savage United Methodist Church. But the pace of Scouts achieving the rank is increasing. There is another Scout in the wings, preparing to become an Eagle.

It was Timothy Cezar's turn in the spotlight Oct. 24 .

The ceremony was held in the Savage Volunteer Fire Hall. The Rev. Cliff Webner gave the invocation.

Richard Greeley was the master of ceremonies.

Sgt. Dennis Beard of the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services was there.

FOR THE RECORD - CORRECTION

Timothy's Eagle project -- building and distributing free house-number signs -- was suggested by the fire department.

The project will help fire and rescue teams to respond to calls in the older Savage neighborhoods, where signs often are damaged or missing.

Timothy didn't make all 60 signs himself. He had the help of Scouts who volunteered to canvass neighborhoods and make signs, including sanding, painting, numbering and installing them.

The helpers were Eric and Scott Owens, John Roberts, Russell Heimlich, Chad Coon, Andy Morgan, Kyle Delane, Kyle Williams, Tommy Johnsen, P. C. Johnsen, Mark Nowacek and Josh Rice.

Dennis R. Schrader of the Howard County Council lent his support, as did his wife, Sandy, who represented the office of State Sen. Martin G. Madden.

The ceremony emphasized the continuing commitment of Scouts to the community, so former Eagle Scouts were invited to participate.

Among those present were Timothy's older brother, Matt, Ralph Heimlich, Dennis Thornton, Billy Palmer, George Williams and Henry Johnson.

Robert Keehser, counselor for the Baltimore Area Council of the Boy Scouts gave the Eagle Challenge.

The larger community acknowledges the contribution of the Eagle Scouts, too.

Among the citations and proclamations that Timothy received were those from President Clinton, Vice President Al Gore, Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes and Barbara A. Mikulski, Gov. Parris N. Glendening, Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett, Madden and County Executive Charles I. Ecker.

Others in attendance were Ed Cezar, Matt Cezar, Bucka Coon, Jack Roberts, Joe Owens, Elaine Williams, John Wayne, Ralph Heimlich, Elliott Rice, Paul Nowacek and Kent Buckingham.

Also present was Larry White of Savage Exxon. He was Timothy's employer the last two summers.

There were more than 165 people in the fire hall to celebrate Timothy's accomplishment.

Library Halloween

Before 5 p.m. today, stop at the Savage Library. Traditionally, staff members dress up for Halloween.

In previous years, the library has been staffed by black cats, Batwoman, a medieval princess, flappers, mice and geishas.

Ham and oyster season

Savage United Methodist Church holds its ham and oyster supper from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday.

This year, a craft fair will go with the meal, providing a chance to shop early for the holidays.

Come early, as knowledgeable Savage citizens get there as soon as possible after 3 p.m.

Take-out is available. Tickets are $10 for adults; $5 for children age 12 or younger.

Baked chicken supper

The Savage Volunteer Fire Company's Ladies Auxiliary will hold a baked chicken supper from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 8.

Diners will get a large portion of chicken, a salad, parsley potatoes a roll, dessert and drink.

Tickets are $7 for adults; $5 for the ages 6 to 12. Children younger than age 6 dine free.

The fire hall is at 8925 Lincoln St. in Savage.

Pub Date: 10/31/97

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