Medical waste firm misled City CouncilThe Sun's Oct. 9...

Letters

October 14, 1997

Medical waste firm misled City Council

The Sun's Oct. 9 editorial, ''Medical waste revisited,'' misses the point in its argument against rescinding City Council legislation allowing a medical waste incinerator to expand its operations.

Jobs, per se, are not the issue. At issue is the company misleading the City Council from the very beginning.

There is more at stake here than meets the eye. No company should be allowed to make promises to the City Council it does not intend to keep to obtain favorable legislation, especially if it is at the expense of environmental safety and workers' jobs.

The council has every right to correct the matter by withdrawing its support.

Edward L. Reisinger

Baltimore

The writer represents the 6th District in the City Council.

Politically incorrect celebration of victory

I am responding to letter writer Robert Como's hand-wringing Oct. 6 diatribe in which he laments, ''Why does The Sun [have to show] pictures of Oriole players celebrating their division title by being doused with champagne?''

Excuse me, but how is it exactly that these players are setting a bad example?

Does Mr. Como have some new evidence that people can get drunk pouring alcohol over their heads? How is squirting champagne into the air ''promoting drug use''?

I say it's time to stop these bleeding-heart liberals before they drain the last drop of fun out of America.

William Smith

Baltimore

Tunnel's design led to Diana's death

The primary responsibility for the three deaths in the Paris tunnel lies with the design of the tunnel itself. Any roadway having concrete columns dividing traffic lanes is an invitation to killing people. If the walls of this tunnel had been constructed with smooth surfaces, such as are used in this country, the Mercedes would probably have glanced between them, resulting in minor injuries to the occupants.

Joseph C. Rohe

Bradshaw

Early intervention might have helped

Your Oct. 2 article on the young man from Mississippi who killed his mother and two female classmates and wounded many others is so very sad.

What Luke Woodham did is unforgivable. That he was tormented by his classmates is equally unforgivable. In a case like this, where it is widely known that a child is being persecuted by his peers, I can only hope that school officials at least tried to intervene.

If there was no attempt by adults to take charge, then the crisis intervention teams dispatched to help the school community are a classic case of closing the barn door after the horse has escaped.

Pamela M. Cobo

Bel Air

Leave Ellen Sauerbrey's teeth alone

It is a convincing demonstration of the triviality of The Sun's political attitudes that you imagine that you have scored a telling point against Ellen R. Sauerbrey in your cartoon of Oct. 2 by exaggerating the prominence of her teeth.

I am not unaware that Mrs. Sauerbrey has prominent teeth, but I have never regarded recessive dentition as relevant to one's capacity for governance. If you have anything substantive to say against her capacity for governance, I shall gladly consider it; the fact that you have to resort to tactics of this sort suggests that there cannot be much.

But what disturbs me most about this cartoon and the many others of its sort that disfigure The Sun's pages is that they so vividly recall the vile caricatures of rabbis and other Jews that appeared in the Nazi organs of the 1930s and 1940s, reflecting the conviction that by depicting one's opponents as grossly as possible one is making a valid debating point against them.

Do you genuinely feel that it demonstrates liberality of outlook to proudly occupy the ground that was so reluctantly relinquished by Adolf Hitler and Julius Streicher half a century ago?

Do you really hope in this way to influence anyone whose opinion is worth having? And is it really effective politically?

Who has been more relentlessly caricatured, and more politically successful, in our time, than Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher?

Robert L. Taylor

Timonium

Pub Date: 10/14/97

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