Seven new books by Sun writers

September 14, 1997|By Michael Pakenham

Seven books by six Sun staff writers and one syndicated investment writer well known to Sun readers have just come on the market or are scheduled to arrive on shop shelves in short order. The editors of The Sun, including the book editor, are proud of the work of our colleagues and believe these books, some of which have grown from their expert labors for this newspaper, to be admirable.

In alphabetical order by author, they are:

***

"The Fountain of Highlandtown," by Rafael Alvarez. (Woodholme. pages. $14.95).

A collection of short stories set in Baltimore by a reporter whose voice and devoted knowledge of all human things that are Baltimore are familiar to Sun readers. The tales are full of joy and anguish and pigs' feet as no one had ever cooked them before.

***

"Cotton Bowl Days: Growing Up With Dallas and The Cowboys in the 1960s" by John Eisenberg. (Simon & Schuster. 300 pages. $24).

A third-generation native of Dallas, Eisenberg, now a columnist for The Sun, was steeped in Cowboys lore and legend from birth. He traces rich memories of the team that grew as Dallas grew and went through the agonies of the 1960s together, never losing its fascination nor the love of its fans. A story of dauntlessness, heroism and coming of age.

***

"KAL Draws a Crowd," by Kevin Kallaugher. (Woodholme. 176 pages. $12.95).

A collection of almost 200 cartoons by The Sun's illustrious political cartoonist who signs himself KAL. Working toward his 5,000th cartoon now, this collection is drawn from the best of his work over the last five years. Each cartoon is published full-sized and is accompanied by a short additional caption that sets the scene and circumstances that are being commented upon. The range of subjects reaches beyond the horizon for cartoons on almost every imaginable subject.

***

"Charm City," by Laura Lippman. (Avon Books. 304 pages. $5.99).

A Baltimore-based mystery story, following on the heels of vTC "Baltimore Blues" and again led by Tess Monaghan, a private investigator who - strangely enough - was once a newspaper reporter. Lippman, who has covered almost every newsworthy circumstance that occurs on the streets of Baltimore, knows of what she writes.

***

"Glory for Sale: Fans, Dollars and the New NFL," by Jon Morgan. (Bancroft Press. 360 pages. $19.95).

A probing study of the business of sports, delving deeply into the inside of the National Football League. Morgan is one of the few reporters in America to have concentrated for a sustained period on sports as commercial enterprise. The book gives revealing insights.

***

"From Colts to Ravens: A Behind the Scenes Look at Baltimore Professional Football," by John F. Steadman. (Tidewater Publishers. 244 pages. $24.95).

Steadman, who has covered sports in Baltimore longer than any other writer or broadcaster alive today, and once was a professional baseball player himself, skillfully narrates the intricate drama of pro football in Baltimore from the organization of the Colts in 1947 through the dawn of the Ravens last year. There is a plenitude of never-before-reported stories - and 60 photographs.

***

"Generation of Wealth: Time-Tested Rules for Worry-Free Investing," by Julius Westheimer. (Bancroft Press. 272 pages. $18.95).

A guide to responsible personal-wealth building by a venerable broker, lecturer, teacher, and a regular on television talk shows for almost 30 years. For more than 20 years, Westheimer has written a syndicated column on investing in The Sun.

Pub Date: 9/14/97

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