Irving Geis,88, an artist who illuminated the wonders of...

Deaths Elsewhere

July 29, 1997

Irving Geis,88, an artist who illuminated the wonders of science, from the vastness of space to the intricacies of molecular structures, died of a cerebral hemorrhage July 22 at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York

For much of his career, the Manhattan resident regularly contributed illustrations to Scientific American, helping readers visualize material about astronomy, astrophysics, geophysics, biochemistry and the like.

Mr. Geis supplied the journal's first drawings of Sputniks in orbit, continental drift and the double helix of DNA.

His innovations in biomolecular art gave him an international reputation, serving as a guide for generations of researchers and science students.

Gen. Saw Maung,68, an unassuming Burmese officer who organized a bloody military coup in 1988 and served as the titular ruler while Myanmar toyed with democracy and then brutally repressed it, died Thursday at his residence in the capital, Yangon. A government statement said the cause was a heart attack.

He had been out of the public eye in Myanmar, as Burma is now known, since he was ousted in 1992 after he began to refer to himself as the reincarnation of an ancient Burmese king.

Heishiro Ogawa,81, Japan's first ambassador to China after the normalization of ties between the two nations in 1972, died of heart failure Friday in Tokyo.

Matiu Rata,63, a Maori political leader who sponsored a law allowing resolution of decades-old Maori land grievances, died Friday in Wellington, New Zealand, from injuries he had suffered in a car crash eight days earlier. He entered New Zealand's Parliament in 1964 and spent 33 years there working on behalf of the nation's indigenous Maori people.

Seni Pramoj,92, who was credited with preventing the United States from attacking Thailand during World War II and went on to serve three terms as Thailand's prime minister, died yesterday.

Pub Date: 7/29/97

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