Red light runners need photo exposureAm I missing...

Letters

April 08, 1997

Red light runners need photo exposure

Am I missing something? Why is there any reason to debate the red light camera issue?

I'm not aware that running a red light has ever been an option, unless you are in an ambulance or part of a funeral procession. And if these red light runners keep it up -- perhaps that's just where we'll find them.

So, to those who are in too much of a hurry to wait for the light to change -- I say, bring on the cameras. It could mean only one less trip to Shock Trauma.

Claire S. Green

Baltimore

First, teach Johnny to spell 'community'

In response to the March 28 front page article "Low test scores may shut school run by parents," should we be surprised that only two of 39 junior high students passed the math portion and one of 37 passed the writing portion of the required yet most basic Maryland Functional Test?

How could anyone ever expect even passing scores at the Stadium School, where the relaxed atmosphere focuses on "hand-on projects exploring community issues, with little emphasis on textbooks or rote drills in classes"?

I, for one, am not so impressed that Johnny understands his community as opposed to being able to "see Spot run" or compose a simple thought on paper or add two plus two.

This daily tragedy can be directly attributed to our wonderful education system as depicted and tested at the Stadium School. These test scores are not just newsworthy but rather disgusting and unacceptable.

Should we expect that one of 37 will be capable writing a simple telephone message down or reading a tape measure? It is a very simple and proven theory: Johnny must be able to read, write, add, and subtract before he "explores his community."

Dave Lombardo

Timonium

Higher teacher pay would attract males

I am responding to The Sun's March 26 editorial, "Lack of good city teachers."

One remedy is funding to attract males into the profession. Without realistic salaries, the exodus of city school teachers will continue.

Many junior grade students in their most formative years are from single-parent homes headed by females.

Dedicated male teachers can make a difference in direction and discipline. This is especially true in cases of young boys who need mentors and role models.

Bill Arwady

Towson

Reference room missed at Pratt

I recently visited the reference room at the Enoch Pratt central library. I was dismayed to find that the "reference room" as a concept has apparently been abolished.

All the materials formerly kept there have been moved to different departments. Atlases, readers' guides, newspaper indexes, telephone directories, encyclopedias, plus the myriad specialized directories that were kept right behind the librarians' desk are now scattered hither and yon.

Having reference materials together is not a mere convenience. When these materials are in one room, with one reference desk, it makes it far more likely that the librarian can suggest some other means to access the information I want -- anything from the Social Register to the Places Rated Almanac.

Further, concerned as we are with school-age students here in the "City That Reads," I suggest that children are far more likely to pursue a topic and learn about the reference aids available, when the study materials are all together.

Doing away with the reference room was a terrible idea. It's not too late to put it back.

Tom M. Padwa

Baltimore

Pub Date: 4/08/97

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