Richard C. Weibel, 66, contract managerRichard C. Weibel...

March 16, 1997

Richard C. Weibel, 66, contract manager

Richard C. Weibel, 66, of Ellicott City, a retired Westinghouse Electric Corp. contract manager, died Feb. 5 of complications of surgery at Howard County General Hospital.

He began his career with Westinghouse in his native Pittsburgh and moved to Baltimore in 1955. He worked in the controller's department until he was promoted to contracts management in the 1960s. He retired in 1988.

He was married in 1953 to the former Jane O'Meara, who died in 1994.

He is survived by three sons, John G. Weibel of Finksburg, Bruce E. Weibel of Laurel and Matthew R. Weibel of Mifflinburg, Pa.; four daughters, Carolyn D. Weibel of Relay, Jennifer A. McElgunn of Catonsville, Mary E. Hughes of Baltimore and Margaret J. Ziegler of Elkridge.

A Mass of Christian burial was offered Feb. 8.

Rev. Thomas O'Donnell, 79, expert on medical ethics

The Rev. Thomas J. O'Donnell, S.J., a Baltimore native who was an expert on medical ethics, a lecturer and an adviser to the Catholic Conference of Bishops, died of pneumonia Thursday at Chestnut Hill Hospital in Philadelphia. He was 79.

Father O'Donnell retired in 1993 to the Jesuit residence at Georgetown University, where he was regent and dean of students at the university's medical and nursing school from 1952 to 1962. He also was professor of medical ethics at the university.

He moved to a Philadelphia nursing home in August.

Father O'Donnell spent much of his childhood in Frostburg, returning to Baltimore with his family in 1931. He graduated from Loyola High School and studied at St. Charles College. He entered the Jesuit order in 1938 and was ordained a priest in 1950.

Locally, Father O'Donnell served as spiritual director and editor of Woodstock Letters at the old Woodstock College from 1962 to 1966.

He also was pastor of several rural churches in North Carolina, taught at St. Pius X Seminary in Erlanger, Ky., and was director of Our Lady of Good Counsel retreat house and rector of the diocesan seminary in Lincoln, Neb.

He was the author of "Morals and Medicine," published in 1956, and "Medicine and Christian Morality," published in 1976.

An avid motorcyclist, he enjoyed touring the East Coast on his BMW model and took the bike to Europe by freighter in 1977 to ride throughout Spain.

A Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the Dahlgren Chapel at Georgetown University in Washington.

He is survived by a brother, John B. O'Donnell of Catonsville, and three generations of nieces and nephews. M. Frederik Smith, a conservationist and consultant who worked under five U.S. presidents, died Wednesday at Stella Maris nursing center in Towson after a series of strokes. He was 88.

Mr. Smith spent much of his life in New York, where he worked as a consultant to philanthropist Laurance S. Rockefeller, as well as serving on the boards of American Motors Corp. and the United Nations Development Corp.

He and his wife moved to Towson several years ago to be near a daughter.

Mr. Smith began his career in public relations before entering government work. During the Roosevelt administration, he was an assistant treasury secretary, then became director of advertising for Simon & Schuster in 1945.

He held various government posts in the Truman, Eisenhower, Johnson and Nixon administrations before joining Mr. Rockefeller in 1964.

Services will be held at 4 p.m. today at the Ruck Towson Funeral Home, 1050 York Road.

Mr. Smith is survived by his wife of 56 years, the former Catherine Hanley; three daughters, Michaele Thorn of Towson, Drusilla Sangemino of Bothell, Wash., and Francesca Korogy of San Diego; three sons, Christopher Smith of Hobe Sound, Fla., Mark Smith of Parkville, Mo., and Frederik Smith of Mill Creek, Wash.; and five grandchildren. Esther Hager-McGohan, 95, who held local and national positions with the Daughters of the American Revolution, died Jan. 26 of heart failure at her Towson residence.

Mrs. Hager-McGohan joined the Baltimore chapter of the DAR in 1929 and participated in the restoration of the Flag House and the warship Constellation during the 1950s.

She was eulogized Friday at the DAR's meeting in Annapolis, and she will be remembered in April at the organization's national conference in Washington.

The former Esther Mitchell was born in Barre, Mass., and moved to Catonsville as a child. She was a 1918 graduate of Catonsville High School, earned her bachelor's degree from the old Towson State Normal School and was a graduate of Strayer Business College.

Her husband of 40 years, Ross Hager, a B&O railroad official, died in 1962. She was married in 1966 to J. Clifton McGohan, also a B&O official, who died in 1993.

She was a member of the Woman's Club of Roland Park, National Society Colonial Dames XVII Century, the Society of New England Women and St. Andrew's Episcopal Church in Glenwood, Howard County.

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