UM's Booth named to All-America third team Senior also gets 2 votes as ACC Player of the Year

March 11, 1997|By Don Markus | Don Markus,SUN STAFF

When the college basketball season began, Maryland coach Gary Williams often complained that senior forward Keith Booth had not gotten the kind of attention that usually goes with playing on a team that had made three straight NCAA tournament appearances.

As the Terrapins embark on their fourth straight trip to the NCAA tournament, Booth is finally getting his accolades.

One week after being named first-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference, Booth yesterday was named a third-team All-American by the Associated Press.

He also received two votes as the ACC's Player of the Year. Wake Forest center Tim Duncan got the other 119.

It was a fitting tribute to a player who has carried Maryland for much of its 21-10 season, which continues with Thursday night's game against the College of Charleston in the first round of the NCAA tournament in Memphis, Tenn.

"I am a strong believer in that if you work hard and have a positive attitude, good things will probably happen," Booth said after practice last night. "It makes me feel great to receive this kind of recognition, but all the credit has to go to my teammates and coaches. There are a lot of All-America-type players out there, but you have to be fortunate to be on a winning team."

Booth has averaged career highs of 19.6 points and 7.9 rebounds for the 22nd-ranked Terrapins. The former Dunbar star is also one of 16 finalists for the John Wooden national Player of the Year award.

NOTES: The College of Charleston, which is seeded 12th in the Southeast Regional to Maryland's fifth, moved up another spot in the AP's Top 25. The Cougars finished the regular season ranked 16th, six places ahead of the Terrapins. Williams finished third in the voting for ACC Coach of the Year, behind Duke's Mike Krzyzewski and North Carolina's Dean Smith.

Pub Date: 3/11/97

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