150 years ago in The SunMarch 10: J.B. Booth -- This...

This Week

March 09, 1997|By Fred Rasmussen

150 years ago in The Sun

March 10: J.B. Booth -- This talented gentleman appears again this evening in the Stranger, whose matchless personification of that character elicited the most rapturous applause from a crowded audience Tuesday last.

March 13: We learn that the Hibernian Association of Baltimore, in view of the suffering conditions of their countrymen, have come to the unanimous conclusion to forego their annual dinner on Wednesday next, in honor of St. Patrick's Day.

100 years ago in The Sun

March 9: For the past few days there has been a great deal of activity shown at the works of the Maryland Steel Company at Sparrow's Point, and it is stated that the works will start up in full in all its departments in a few months.

March 11: Manager Hanlon has returned from New York where he has been for several days buying uniforms and other baseball necessaries for the champions. He has notified the players to report here March 16, and the club will leave that evening for the South.

50 years ago in The Sun

March 10: Taking advantage of the sunshine and the first recent Sunday with highways wholly cleared of snow, thousands of motorists were on the road in the Baltimore area yesterday, city and county police reported.

March 12: H. C. Byrd, president of the University of Maryland, today predicted that Negro students would be admitted to the university schools at College Park unless something is done soon for improving Princess Anne College. Princess Anne College is the Negro branch of the university.

March 14: "Love Laughs at Andy Hardy," at the Century, may be the last of a long series if M.G.M. sticks to its announcement that it will be abandoned. It is Mickey Rooney's first postwar appearance on the screen, and although he makes himself liked, as usual, in the title role, it is fairly obvious that he has outgrown this perennial story.

Pub date: 3/09/97

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