In language of broadcasting, Reghi is synonym for energy

Media Watch

February 28, 1997|By MILTON KENT

Whatever folks may think of his modus operandi, newly appointed Orioles television announcer Michael Reghi will agree with them that his style won't put people to sleep.

"If you ask other people, I think they would say I'm high energy. I'm very enthusiastic," Reghi said this week in an introductory meeting at the B&O warehouse. "Sometimes my critics might say that I may have gone overboard at times, but it's my passion for the game coming out, whatever it may be -- baseball, basketball or football."

Reghi, a 40-year-old native of Detroit, takes over this spring for Mel Proctor, the main television voice of the Orioles since Home Team Sports signed on in 1984, and while Proctor, who leaves to call San Diego Padres games, would have been welcomed back, HTS officials are looking forward to presenting a different product.

"In putting Mike with our analysts, you're going to see a team develop that's going to have a lot of energy and perhaps more energy than we've had over the last few years," said HTS general manager Jody Shapiro. "Mel is a pro, but he's been doing it for a long time and he's seen a lot of ins and outs. We're going to get a fresh look, a fresh enthusiasm for the game."

While the rest of the HTS and WBAL (1090 AM) teams have heavy Baltimore influences, the main voices, Reghi and Jim Hunter on the radio side, are out-of-towners. In fact, a former Oriole, Ken Singleton was passed over for Reghi.

"The two voices we've hired, both HTS and WBAL, will become an integral part of this community," said Michael Lehr, the Orioles' executive director of marketing and broadcasting. "You're going to get Jim Hunter and Michael Reghi to eventually live here and be part of this community and work within it. I don't think that will go away. I know they'll be accepted."

Said Shapiro: "HTS considers itself a part of the fabric. We're not bringing in carpetbaggers. We're bringing in people who are going to work in the community itself. We do 150 baseball games. He [Reghi] is going to be here a whole lot. People are really going to get used to him and love him."

Reghi will continue to call Cleveland Cavaliers games this season and next, making his first Orioles appearance on March 29.

The Bethesda-based channel formally announced that Jim Palmer will return as an analyst on 50 telecasts, and Mike Flanagan will do 110 games. Tom Davis will return to as host of the pre-game show and will fill in for Reghi on some preseason games.

Tumbling walls

Getting the jump on virtually everyone else, ESPN's "Outside the Lines" presents a look at the life and times of Jackie Robinson and the historical impact of his breaking baseball's color barrier 50 years ago this April 15 in a powerful, one-hour documentary tonight at 8: 30.

Among the segments in the program is a report that white players from at least four teams took votes on whether they should boycott the Brooklyn Dodgers when Robinson played, or just strike completely in protest over Robinson's presence. According to the show, the Chicago Cubs did, in fact, vote to strike, but players were told that they would be banned if they walked out.

"If there had been boycotts and strikes, it could have been as damaging to the game as the Black Sox scandal," said coordinating producer Chris Martens.

Following "Outside the Lines," "Nightline's" Ted Koppel will anchor a one-hour "town meeting" on the issue of race and sports from the campus of Howard University. These two hours are truly TV that you must see.

Around the dial

The anticipated battle between Michelle Kwan and Tara Lipinski is the saving grace in yet another figure skating "competition," this one called the Fox Skate International Champions Final, airing in prime time tomorrow night at 8 (Channel 45).

In case you hadn't heard, Lipinski, a 14-year-old, knocked off Kwan, the reigning world champion, in the U.S. Figure Skating Championships a few weeks ago, and rumor has it that Kwan is out for revenge. A second program will air Sunday at 4: 30 p.m.

ABC and CBS this week have announced plans to each launch limited boxing series, and the Alphabet Gang strikes first tomorrow with a WBC lightweight championship bout from Paris, where champion Jean-Baptiste Mendy meets unbeaten challenger Steve Johnston (Channel 2, 4: 30 p.m.).

In addition to the live fight, "Wide World of Sports" will look back at the dramatic 1981 fight between Sugar Ray Leonard and Thomas Hearns, just hours before Leonard humiliates himself against Hector Camacho.

On the radio side, Jerry Moshenberg and Joe Platania mark their first anniversary with the "Weekend Sports Spectrum" tomorrow at 4 on WWLG (1360 AM), while WBAL continues Orioles coverage with games today and tomorrow against Florida, each at 12: 35 p.m., and against Montreal on Sunday after the Maryland-Virginia men's basketball game.

Pub Date: 2/28/97

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