Where's the pitching?Remember last year's message to the...

LETTERS

February 23, 1997

Where's the pitching?

Remember last year's message to the Orioles after the Yankees ended their season? It's the pitching, stupid. At least one starter, maybe two.

So, what has been done to bolster the pitching? The Orioles dragged their feet with David Wells and pushed the price up. They had discussions with top free-agent pitchers, and while the Orioles contemplated, they all signed. Jimmy Key? Great

addition. Shawn Boskie? ERA almost 5.00. Scott Kamieniecki? Give me a break. Do you think a rotation of Mike Mussina, Key, Scott Erickson, Rocky Coppinger and Boskie will get the Orioles to the World Series?

Sheldon Caplis

Baltimore In response to John S. Brown's letter, "Washingtonians, keep out: " Since you don't want Washington fans at Orioles games, how about letting Washington fans know about the Bandits, Spirit and Thunder? Because, looking at their average attendance figures, Baltimore fans sure aren't attending!

Ken Hess Pasadena What happened to '97?

Can somebody tell me how the Orioles' 1997 season went? I must have missed it. I am reading in the paper that Brady `D Anderson and Mike Mussina might be going to Cleveland and the Indians might have to move some players to make room under their salary cap. What is wrong with baseball nowadays? We have not even played a practice game yet, and we are already discussing 1998. Come on, give us a chance to enjoy one season at a time.

Denny Croghan

Lutherville

Ripken offer generous

I think the Orioles made a very generous offer of $6.2 million per year for three years to Cal Ripken. He'll be 40 when that contract expires. On the other hand, and for the sake of the fans, the Orioles should cough it up. The extra money is pocket change to Peter Angelos!

If Ripken signs with a new team, there will be no guarantee he'll play every day. Once he goes into one of his famous hitting slumps, he'll find himself on the pine. Then what? It'll be a sad day to watch him sitting on the bench with a long face to end his career. Stay in Baltimore, Cal -- the fans love you!

Mike Weaver

Dover, Del. Finally, on Feb. 16, a Baltimore sportswriter wrote an article about a true American sporting event. Sandra McKee wrote not about a "circus" like the Rodmans, the Cowboys, the contracts ** and the salaries of the so-called professional athletes of the era. NASCAR is now a big business, only because of the average American fans, the drivers, the car owners and Bill France, a true "for the fans" commissioner.

It is a concept in which we believe and feel good about giving our hard earned money to support such a great American sport.

Ken Beran

Stewartstown, Pa.

More local golf wanted

I would like to direct a hint to your sports department regarding the lack of golf coverage. Very little is written about local pro and amateur events. I feel a description of local golf courses and the price and policy of playing would help. The Baltimore area has many people interested in golf and the outcome of local events. I miss the writing of past reporters like George Taylor. Even a once-a-week update would be nice.

Roger Leonard

Reisterstown

Family ties

I was distressed after reading your Feb. 13 article about the sons of Ken Singleton and John Unitas. As a lifelong Baltimorean and sports fan, I treasure my memories of the accomplishments of Ken Singleton and Johnny Unitas. However, I must question a system that gives full athletic scholarships to families who can certainly afford to pay the cost of a college education. Are there not students without the luxury of private school educations and wealthy parents more deserving of such scholarship funds?

Clarke Miller Fitzmaurice

Baltimore I am a graduate of Johns Hopkins University and follow its sports programs with enthusiasm. Please tell me why its basketball scores are omitted from page 1 of the sports section left-hand column under the head of "College Scoreboard, State Games."

Also advise why its basketball games are omitted from the inside page under the heading of "Tonight's games." Thank you for omitting mention of Johns Hopkins in your "The line" column. I believe that this should be eliminated completely as it serves no useful purpose to readers aside from promoting "illegal" gambling.

Stanley Wagner

Baltimore

He's had enough

The Letters column is a great format for sports fans to express their ideas. Louis Levin has taken this opportunity to share his dislike of the Ravens, and now his spectacular article on hunting. Mr. Levin, I know you're determined to get good use of the dictionary you received over the holidays, but please give it a break already.

Don Brown

Baltimore

We welcome your letters. They should include your name, address and a daytime telephone number. We edit letters for length and clarity when necessary. Send them to:

Sports Department

The Baltimore Sun

501 N. Calvert St.

Baltimore, Md. 21278-0001

Or fax us your letter:

(410) 783-2518

Pub Date: 2/23/97

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