This Week150 years ago in The SunFeb. 16: Run Over -- A...

THIS WEEK

February 16, 1997|By Fred Rasmussen | Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF

This Week

150 years ago in The Sun

Feb. 16: Run Over -- A man was run over by the suction-engine of the Friendship Fire Company, near the location of the fire in Union Alley on Sunday night, and somewhat hurt. Both wheels passed directly over his abdomen.

Feb. 17: We do not like to say one word against the rational and healthful amusement of the boys, but they may go in their amusements, and do go, a little further than ought to be allowable. Almost every boy, who can raise a ball, appears to be about this time using it -- they are thrown against the sides of houses, regardless of the effect which may be upon window glass or any thing else.

Feb. 20: Special Car -- We notice that the directors of the Baltimore and Philadelphia Railroad Company have lately placed their road a splendid ladies' car of superior construction and finish.

100 years ago in The Sun

Feb. 16: Postmaster Warfield had presented in the Council last night an ordinance requiring street railway companies to carry the mails.

Feb. 18: The first Chinese pupil to enter the public schools of Baltimore entered primary school No. 10, Hollins Street near Schroeder, yesterday. His name is Hom Let and he was born in California fifteen years ago.

Feb. 22: Patrolman Henry Dingle attempted to jump from an electric car while on his way to the police station in South Baltimore yesterday and was thrown against a telegraph pole with such violence that he was unable to go on duty.

50 years ago in The Sun

Feb. 16: Veterans studying in Maryland colleges and universities are doing work equal to or better than that of their nonveteran classmates, a survey of several of the schools indicated yesterday.

Feb. 17: For the first time in its history, Baltimore's City Jail has a Negro guard, David L. Hubbard, who recently passed an examination for guards conducted by the City Service Commission.

Feb. 21: London, Feb. 20 (AP) -- The British today for the first time set a definite date -- June 1948 -- for getting out of India and designating a great-grandson of the first empress of India to liquidate almost 200 years of rule over that rich sub-continent of 400,000,000.

Pub date: 2/16/97

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