Redskins, Md. agree on pay scale for county roads Workers at stadium site to earn prevailing wage

December 25, 1996|By John Rivera | John Rivera,SUN STAFF

State officials and the Washington Redskins reached an agreement yesterday under which the football team will pay workers the prevailing wage for state-funded highway construction on county roads at the team's new stadium in Prince George's County.

The Redskins and state highway officials reached an agreement last month under which the team will pay prevailing wages on several projects on state roads near the stadium site.

"All state and county off-site infrastructure construction will require payment of prevailing wages," said Chuck Brown, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Transportation.

"Additionally, the Department of Transportation and Jack Kent Cook Stadium have agreed to require payment of prevailing wages for $8 million worth of on-site asphalt work."

The $8 million in asphalt work represents about 30 percent of the on-site construction, which includes the parking lot, lighting and signs, Brown said. "It is a fairly large contract," he said.

Although the state is contributing as much as $70.5 million to the stadium project -- for a parking lot and other improvements at the site and improving state and county roads -- it agreed to let the Redskins manage the work.

Team representatives contended that a state law passed this year exempted the highway projects from paying workers the prevailing wage, but representatives of Gov. Parris N. Glendening countered that such an exemption never was intended, leading to protracted negotiations.

The state long has had a prevailing-wage law similar to the federal Davis-Bacon Act, which requires that companies working government projects pay a wage rate that usually is comparable to union scale.

Redskins owner Jack Kent Cooke is paying for the stadium himself, at a cost of at least $170 million.

Pub Date: 12/25/96

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