Irving Caesar,101, who wrote the words to "Tea for Two...

Deaths Elsewhere

December 19, 1996

Irving Caesar,101, who wrote the words to "Tea for Two," "Swanee" and other songs that made musical comedy shine in the 1920s and 1930s, died Tuesday in New York.

His collaborators included George Gershwin, Oscar Levant and Sammy Lerner. The songs he wrote lyrics for include: "Just a Gigolo," "Crazy Rhythm" and the Shirley Temple tune "Animal Crackers in My Soup."

He also occasionally composed the music for songs, as with "If I Forget You." Mr. Caesar, who was born July 4, 1895, in New York, met Gershwin about 1916, when the genius of popular music was still a teen-ager. Both were struggling Manhattan songwriters.

Jean-Pierre Guerlain,92, former chairman and chief executive of the cosmetics and perfume company bearing his family name, died Dec. 12 in Paris. He was the son of company founder Pierre Guerlain. The company makes fragrances, including Shalimar, l'Heure Bleue and Champs-Elysees.

Robert M. Adams,81, a literary critic and translator of classic texts, died Monday in Santa Fe, N.M. He was a founding editor of the "Norton Anthology of English Literature" and an editor of the Hudson Review. His translations, used at colleges nationwide, include Voltaire's "Candide," Stendhal's "The Red and the Black" and Machiavelli's "The Prince."

John L. Strubbe,75, a retired Kroger Co. executive who helped establish the use of bar code scanning at supermarket checkout counters, died Saturday in Cincinnati of Parkinson's disease. He guided the development of the Universal Product Code and scanner, taking the model developed for the railroad industry and adapting it to retail uses.

Ruby Murray,61, an Irish singer who topped the charts in the 1950s -- including one week in which she had five hits -- died of liver cancer Tuesday in London. Her success deteriorated during a long battle against alcoholism. Her first recording, "Heartbeat," sold 200,000 copies, followed by another big hit, "Softly, Softly."

Pub Date: 12/19/96

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