Pride commemorates the past and parades in the present

December 15, 1996|By SYLVIA BADGER

In Sunday's Today section, the commodore of the Fells Point Yacht Club was incorrectly named. Stanley M. Ali became the club's commodore in November.

The Sun regrets the errors.

AWFUL, RAINY WEATHER was the backdrop when the Pride of Baltimore II sailed into Baltimore's Inner Harbor at precisely 12: 55 p.m. Dec. 7 and fired shots from its cannons to mark the exact local time that the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor 55 years earlier. After the commemoration, Pride II's Capt. Jan Miles and his crew attended a welcome-home ceremony at the World Trade Center. The Pride was returning from visiting 21 ports in 13 countries in a nine-month period, so it was a festive reunion for Pride members and their families, despite the weather.

Pride board members Eamonn McGeady, Janet Barnhill and Bill Beasman stopped by for the ceremonies, as did U.S. Sen. Paul Sarbanes and Tay Yoshitani, director of the Maryland Port Authority. Almost immediately, the Pride had to be prepared to participate in the Fells Point Yacht Club's annual Parade of Lights. It joined 20 powerboats and sailboats, all decked out with Christmas lights. Even the Harbor Shuttle and the city's garbage boat got gussied up for the parade.

FOR THE RECORD - CORRECTION

You can bet that Pride crew members and parade-boat captains were more than ready to join Fells Point Yacht Club Commodore Bob McMichael for the post-parade party at St. Stanislaus Church. The Pride will be at the Finger Piers for repair work through April.

Marketing success

Members of the Baltimore Marketing Association and their guests filled Martin's West for the 28th annual business awards dinner. It was a festive event that honored three prominent local African-American entrepreneurs. Cathy Hughes, chairwoman and CEO of Radio One Broadcasting Inc., which owns eight radio stations, was presented with the BMA's Henry G. Parks Award. The other honorees were two pioneering businessmen, Carroll Hynson Sr. and Deaver Smith. Both were inducted posthumously into the BMA Hall of Fame. Hynson owned and operated an insurance business for more than 30 years and was the first African-American in Maryland to serve as a county commissioner. Smith established a coffee and tea emporium in 1906 on Pennsylvania Avenue. Hynson's and Smith's sons were there to accept the awards.

Barbara Smith was the keynote speaker for the evening. In addition to having worked as a model with the Wilhelmina Agency, she owns B. Smith's restaurants in New York and Union Station in Washington, and wrote "B. Smith's Entertaining and Cooking for Friends."

Holiday homes

There's no place like home for the holidays, particularly when they are decorated like the ones on this year's annual BSA Symphony Homes for the Holidays walking tour. Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Casgar, Mr. and Mrs. Austin George, Mr. and Mrs. David Nelson, Dr. and Mrs. Harry Stevens, Mr. and Mrs. J. Richard Thomas Jr., and the Rev. and Mrs. Ernest Smart were among the Guilford residents who opened their homes to help the Baltimore Symphony Associates raise money to support the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.

The homeowners got a little artistic help from floral designers Dale Klietz and Tim Green, J.J. Cummings; Darlene Waters, the French Tulip; Diane Carter and Teresa Kastner, Roland Park Florist; Eleanor Oster; Rhea Arnot; Karen Lock and Kathleen McGuire, Flower Markets; and Susan Kershaw.

Spotted making the tour and at the preview party at the Hopkins Club were this year's honorary chairman, WJZ's Don Scott, and his wife, Deborah; Betty Reeves and Susan Woven, co-chairwomen of the event; Maureen Eliason, president of the BSA; Anne Jung, preview party chairwoman; Anne Lambdin, adviser; Christine Farnsworth, boutique chairwoman; Sally Jane Boone and Jean Lubke, house coordinators; Judy Zach, raffle co-chairwoman; and Maryanne Dunmire, ticket co-chairwoman.

Being crabby

We've all heard comments about the power of the media, and now Rose and Richard Cernak, owners of Obrycki's Crab House on Pratt Street, are believers. Although their seafood restaurant officially closed for the winter last Sunday, they have been busier than ever because of a remark Oprah Winfrey made on her show the day before Thanksgiving. Seems she was talking about some of her favorite things in life, and mentioned Obrycki's crab cakes, which she said were the best in the world.

Rose says the response has been overwhelming. They have been so inundated with mail-order requests for crab cakes that they've been hard-pressed to keep up; but she says all orders will be delivered by Dec. 17. Obrycki's will reopen for the season March 18.

Take it to heart

Roger Blumenthal, one of Maryland's pre-eminent cardiologists and the director of the Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, has given up another title -- one of Maryland's most eligible bachelors. I hear he's asked Wendy S. Post, a fellow in the Johns Hopkins Hospital Cardiology Department, to marry him.

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