Edith Ann and Pretender try to save Christmas

Today's TV

December 14, 1996|By Chris Kaltenbach | Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF

The daytime soaps invade prime time tonight. Be prepared.

"An Edith Ann Christmas" (8: 30 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The animated version of Lily Tomlin's wise-beyond-her-years little girl looks as if she'll have a less-than-happy Christmas: Her best friend's been hit in a drive-by shooting and her sister has run away from home. But if anyone can turn things around, it's Edith-Ann. And that's the truth. ABC.

"General Hospital" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Luke, Laura and the gang get their first-ever exposure in prime time. Plot: more of the usual comings and goings of the residents of Port Charles. ABC.

"Pretender" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Jack-of-all-trades Jarod spends his Christmas as a medical examiner right here in Baltimore, tracking down the murderer of a homeless person and cheering up children at a shelter. NBC.

"Opryland's Country Christmas" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Straight from the Nashville stage, some of country music's finest celebrate the holidays. Among the revelers: Hank Williams Jr., Patty Loveless, Clint Black, Lorrie Morgan, Barbara Mandrell and Wynonna (in a duet with Kenny Rogers). CBS.

"Walker, Texas Ranger" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Walker and his fellow Rangers are out to protect the Israeli ambassador, who's in Dallas and the target of an international assassin. CBS.

"Saturday Night Live" (11: 30 p.m.-12: 30 a.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- With Whitney Houston doing the singing, at least there could be some good tunes tonight. NBC.

Cable

"The Public Enemy" (8 p.m.-9: 30 p.m.) and "Little Caesar" (9: 30 p.m.-11 p.m., TCM) -- Double-features like this are what makes TCM such a jewel: "Public Enemy" first brought Jimmy Cagney to prominence, as a big-time hood with a dangerously short temper (he even pushes a grapefruit in his wife's face, the cad) and Jean Harlow as his moll. "Little Caesar" made Edward G. Robinson a star and featured the most famous death scene since the original Caesar. Together, these two 1931 films set the tone for just about every gangster movie made since.

"The Real Life of Barbie" (10 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 1 a.m.-2 a.m., The Learning Channel) -- Marie Osmond narrates this hour-long commercial for America's best-selling doll. Sure, at 37, she deserves a little star treatment, but the special gives short shrift to the continuing controversy over the message Barbie conveys to young girls -- although a segment on the Barbie Liberation Organization (BLO) is intriguing. Barbie collectors should enjoy themselves, though.

Pub Date: 12/14/96

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.