Arvie injury called spinal cord contusion Offensive lineman regains feeling, but is ruled out of game against Carolina

Ravens notebook

December 10, 1996|By Gary Lambrecht and Roch Eric Kubatko | Gary Lambrecht and Roch Eric Kubatko,SUN STAFF

A magnetic resonance imaging exam has revealed that Ravens offensive lineman Herman Arvie suffered a small contusion on his spinal cord in the closing moments of Sunday's 21-14 loss to the Cincinnati Bengals.

Ravens trainer Bill Tessendorf said Arvie will have another MRI on Friday, and added that he is not expected to play against the Carolina Panthers on Sunday. Arvie could be out for the rest of the season.

"We're in a wait-and-see mode as far as the rest of the season for him, but everything is normal. He's got all of his feeling back," Tessendorf said.

Arvie was stunned by a hit on the top of his helmet by cornerback Sam Shade -- the same guy who tackled fullback Carwell Gardner at the Bengals' 1-yard line on the Ravens' final play -- before crumbling to the turf for 10 anxious minutes. He was taken off the field on a stretcher.

It was an unnerving sight for the Ravens, especially Arvie's offensive linemates.

"It's like a brother lying on the field. It's like a piece of you," said center Wally Williams, who filled in for injured Steve Everitt on Sunday. "We're still in the middle of a game, but to see someone that close to you being taken out on a stretcher, I didn't know whether to get mad or just cry for him.

"I didn't feel straight after the game until I shook hands with him and saw him moving around [in the locker room]," Williams added. "Every time the ball is snapped, it's a roll of the dice. You're shooting for sevens and trying to avoid snake eyes. It's something that goes through your mind every day."

Questioning the call

After the loss in Cincinnati, some of the Ravens privately second-guessed the decision to throw on fourth down from the Bengals' 1 with 30 seconds left. It was a gadget play in which rookie guard Jonathan Ogden, who caught a touchdown pass last week against the Pittsburgh Steelers, was the primary receiver. When he couldn't get open, quarterback Vinny Testaverde dumped the ball off to Gardner for no gain.

Morris, who had been stopped on two previous carries from the 1, wanted another shot at the end zone. But coach Ted Marchibroda said if he had it to do over again, he would make the same call.

He had time to reconsider Sunday when the game was delayed for several minutes because of the injury to Arvie.

"We decided to go with that play right from the beginning," Marchibroda said. "We'd run the first two plays, and if we had to throw it, we'd throw it on the last down."

As for the second-guessing, Marchibroda said, "That's all right, that's fine. That's all part of the game."

Bad luck continues

Wide receiver Floyd Turner expects to practice this week, possibly as early as tomorrow. Turner was a late scratch from the Bengals game after pulling his right calf muscle in Saturday's workout.

Turner caught a pass from backup quarterback Eric Zeier and felt a twinge in the calf. He then did some light jogging to loosen up the calf, to no avail.

"I went home, sat on the edge of the bed and thought to myself, 'This is absolutely amazing.' It's been a banner year," said Turner, who missed the first three games while recovering from arthroscopic knee surgery. That repaired a freak injury he suffered in training camp. He later missed another game with a strained left calf.

Turner, who has 31 catches for 368 yards and two touchdowns, said he called rookie receiver Jermaine Lewis and told him to get ready to play Sunday. Before the game, Turner tried warming up, but the calf didn't respond.

Burned out

In three games this season, including Sunday's loss, Ravens defensive lineman Mike Frederick has gone down with a "burner," a common term for a neck injury that results in a burning or tingling sensation into the shoulder or arm.

"We're concerned about Mike Frederick, yes, but by the same token, the doctors have said all the tests have proved there's nothing physically wrong with Mike," Marchibroda said. "We certainly want Mike to feel better, but there is not a concern about putting him on the football field."

Pub Date: 12/10/96

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